Detail: We are here by Linda Wachtel, 2015, The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals exhibition. Former prime ministers the Hon John Howard OM AC and the Hon Bob Hawke AC GCL during Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference. Visitors to Card Castle during Enlighten festival. Students attending ACT Constitutional Convention 2017.

Museum of Australian Democracy

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

ANNUAL REPORT
2017–18

Museum of Australian Democracy

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

ANNUAL REPORT
2017–18

©Commonwealth of Australia 2018

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior permission from Old Parliament House.

ISSN: 1837–2309

Published by Old Parliament House
Edited by WordsWorth Writing, Canberra
Designed and typeset by CRE8IVE
Printed by CanPrint

This report is available online at
moadoph.gov.au/about/annual-reports

This report is illustrated with comments from Australians who took part in a research project on trust in the political system and attitudes towards democracy, conducted by the Museum of Australian Democracy and the Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis and described in the report How Australians imagine their democracy: the ‘power of us’.

Cover photos from top to bottom:

Detail We are here by Linda Wachtel, 2015, The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals exhibition. Photo by: Mark Nolan

Former prime ministers the Hon John Howard OM AC and the Hon Bob Hawke AC GCL during Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference. Photo by: Chalk Studio

Visitors to Card Castle during Enlighten festival. Photo by: Rebecca Selleck

Students attending ACT Constitutional Convention 2017. Photo by: MoAD staff

Contacts

Physical address Old Parliament House
18 King George Terrace
Parkes ACT 2600

Mailing address Old Parliament House
PO Box 3934
Manuka ACT 2603

General enquiries

Contact Reception staff

Phone (02) 6270 8222

Email info@moadoph.gov.au

Website moadoph.gov.au

Museum of Australian Democracy

Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield
Minister for Communications and the Arts
Parliament House
Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

On behalf of the Board of Old Parliament House, I am pleased to forward to you the annual report on the operations of Old Parliament House for the year ended 30 June 2018.

As the accountable authority for Old Parliament House, the Board is responsible for preparing the report and providing it to you, in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The report was approved by the Board at its meeting on 3 September 2018.

Yours sincerely

David Kemp's signature

The Hon Dr David Kemp AC
Chair
Board of Old Parliament House
3 September 2018

Old Parliament House

Contents

Our vision1

Year in Review5

Snapshot of results6

Chair’s statement8

Director’s report9

Report on performance13

Annual performance statements14

Achievements17

Strategic priority 1: Enriched experiences17

Strategic priority 2: Schools learning19

Strategic priority 3: The place21

Strategic priority 4: Our organisational culture24

Case studies26

PlayUP: The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard26

Behind the Lines: The Year’s Best Political Cartoons27

Card Castle28

Collection storage relocation29

Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference30

Democracy, Media and Me32

History in the making33

The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals34

New stories in old spaces35

Old Parliament House

Old Parliament House.
Photo by: Andrew Merry

Governance37

Organisation38

Responsible minister38

Structure39

Corporate governance41

Strategic planning42

Ethical standards42

Reconciliation Action Plan43

Risk management43

Fraud control43

Insurance and indemnities for officers43

External scrutiny43

Work health and safety44

Advertising and market research44

Ecologically sustainable development 44

Financial statements47

Summary of financial management and performance48

Financial statements48

Indexes75

Compliance list76

Index77

What do you think are Australia's most important democratic values?
Top 10 most frequently mentioned responses:
Free and fair elections

Our vision

We need to get more involved but they [government and politicians] don’t have time for us and our views. Apart from election time. Then they’re interested in us. Maybe that’s what needs to change. They need to be as interested in our views when they’ve been elected.

FIRST-TIME VOTER

New and Old Parliament Houses of Australia

Photo by: Andrew Merry

The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House plays a significant role in enriching understanding and appreciation of Australia’s political legacy and the intrinsic value of our democracy.

With an Australian perspective, in a country made up of over 200 nationalities, the museum provides a space not just to celebrate our democratic traditions, but also to truly collaborate with our audiences and stakeholders. We embrace this opportunity to connect communities, encourage participation and value freedom.

The museum enriches the conversation on democracy through exhibitions, tours, talks, festivals, celebrations, artworks, films, markets, concerts, memorials and online resources. It offers visitors a place to connect with family and friends, and opportunities to make the iconic setting of Old Parliament House a central part of their civic and individual experiences.

Our vision to celebrate the spirit of Australian democracy and the power of your voice within it has four dimensions:

What do you think the responsibilities of a champion of Australian democracy should be?
Top ten most frequently mentioned responses:
To uphold the freedoms fundamental to our democracy and prevent their erosion

Year in Review

Australia has come a long way for a young country. We are a great democracy but I think we take a lot for granted. I do think democracy is under attack. If you look at all the democracies in our backyard, with the exception of New Zealand, they are all vulnerable. It’s our responsibility to make our democracy stronger.

COASTAL AUSTRALIAN

Snapshot of results

Infographic of the snapshot of results Infographic of the snapshot of results

Chair’s statement

The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House has a deep commitment to enriching our understanding of the processes of government and the events that shape democracy in Australia.

The museum achieves this through a broad range of innovative exhibitions, events and programs that seek to engage visitors in meaningful and inspirational ways. Our learning team experiments with new and innovative ways to extend the museum’s reach across the nation and engage with more than 80,000 students and teachers who visit the building each year.

Audiences have responded with great enthusiasm. Today, the museum is a hub of activity: the number of people visiting Old Parliament House has doubled since 2012. The growth in visitation and participation is a great testament to the museum’s Director, Ms Daryl Karp, who has been appointed for a second five-year term, and to the staff who deliver on the core promise of engaging Australians with the democratic process.

As a corporate Commonwealth entity, the museum investigated and implemented new revenue streams and self-generated income to the tune of $2.47 million, largely by renting floor space to like-minded institutions, in 2017–18.

The many successes achieved in the past year would not have been possible without the support of the Australian Government and its Minister for Communications and the Arts, Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield. Additional funding awarded in the 2017–18 Budget, comprising $13.64 million from the Public Service Modernisation Fund and $908,000 in strategic assistance, is having an impact. That money will support critical building maintenance works, along with exhibition upgrades and the development of a plan to protect the heritage values of Old Parliament House and modernise and refresh the building.

The Hon Dr David Kemp AC

The Hon Dr David Kemp AC, Chair.

Our ongoing success would not be possible without the support we receive from our partners, volunteers and donors. Without them, we could not achieve what we do. I would also like to express my sincere thanks to my fellow board members.

The year 2017–18 was one of tremendous activity and growth, of which we are very proud. We look forward to the implementation of our ambitious plans for the year ahead.

David Kemp's signature

The Hon Dr David Kemp AC
Chair

Director’s report

The Museum of Australian Democracy is Canberra’s youngest national cultural institution. Less than a decade old, it is located in one of the nation’s most important historic buildings, Old Parliament House.

The Old Parliament House at sunset

Photo by: Andrew Merry

In a world where trust in institutions is eroding, and press freedom, fair elections and the number of full democracies around the world are in decline, the museum continues its leadership role in informing, educating and engaging Australians with democracy. It is a place in which individuals can reconnect with our national story and reassess their own roles in upholding Australia’s democratic values.

A five-year vision

2017–18 was a year of bold planning and development, made possible by additional Australian Government funding of $13.64 million over three years. This much-needed investment in the preservation of the building resulted in whole-of-organisation planning for a three-year program of building upgrades, modernisation of key systems and redevelopment of three permanent galleries.

The successful conclusion of our second strategic plan saw a doubling of general museum and online visitation over five years. It also provided an inspired baseline for the new strategic framework for 2018 to 2023, which sets out to establish the museum as a place of influence and discourse—a museum not just of objects, but also of ideas.

Your voice counts

Participation and engagement are central to our modus operandi. We seek to reflect the democratic traditions of debate and conversation through all our activities, and new exhibitions and events incorporate carefully crafted opportunities for individual reflection and response. The exhibition The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals explored the experience of migration and citizenship, and invited visitors to write a letter of welcome to a new Australian.

Our redeveloped under-sevens gallery, PlayUP, took Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (the right to speak and be heard) as a basis for age-appropriate facilitated daily activities.

The unique large-scale participatory exhibition Card Castle, held over four nights during Canberra’s annual Enlighten festival, drew a record 17,827 people, all keen to share their stories of community, trust, courage and more. Our future permanent gallery Democracy. Are You In? will capture data from visitors to feed into ongoing academic research.

A key challenge has been extending our experiential approach beyond the physical spaces of heritage-listed Old Parliament House. As our digital footprint continues to grow, we become more confident in shaping conversations in the online space. This year we engaged with over 114,000 people through social media, a 6 per cent increase from the previous financial year, despite a dramatically more volatile social media landscape. Our websites drew a 15 per cent increase in visits compared to the previous year.

Enriching education

Our civics education offer continues to perform very well. In 2017–18, 84,991 students and teachers participated in our programs—the highest number on record. Satisfaction ratings from teachers were 98 per cent, due to the combination of curriculum-linked and personalised collaborative learning programs underpinned by our internationally award-winning RFID (radio frequency identification) technology program.

This year we began rolling out a new digital excursion for primary students. The program, Democracy, Media and Me, targets regional and remote schools and provides the same unique, real-time, interactive education experience as our onsite programs.

Influence and impact

The museum is committed to enhancing knowledge, stimulating our creativity and enriching our souls. It also takes seriously a key characteristic of the modern twenty-first century museum: to be a place of trusted open dialogue. A key focus for the year was extending our reach with events that combine research, media engagement and thought leadership. Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference brought together influencers from across politics, business, technology, arts, academia and more, in a conversation about democratic renewal. Former prime ministers Bob Hawke and John Howard set the scene in an interview which was broadcast live by the ABC, reaching an audience of 100,000. The resultant Charter of Democracy features in the upcoming exhibition Democracy. Are You In?

Our staff presented 19 papers at conferences, including a paper titled Digital technologies, the spirit of place and active citizenship at the Museum of Australian Democracy, which was presented at the Nineteenth ICOMOS Triennial General Assembly and International Scientific Symposium held in New Delhi in December 2017.

PlayUP was recognised with the Museums and Galleries National Award for best permanent medium-sized exhibition and is shortlisted for the 2018 Children in Museums Awards (sponsored by the International Association of Children in Museums and the European Museum Academy). The museum also won the National Trust ACT Heritage Award for its outstanding contribution to ACT heritage for the Playing the Long Game project.

Partnerships and reach

Our broader success comes from well-honed partnerships with external organisations that help to enrich and heighten our own activities. As a founding partner of the Canberra Writers Festival, we continue to benefit from the cross-pollination of ideas, conversations and debates.

We have enjoyed a strong and mutually beneficial partnership with the University of Canberra’s Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, whose research on trust and attitudes to democracy underpins the upcoming Democracy. Are You In? exhibition.

Our partnership with Crinkling News, Australia’s only newspaper for children, included working together on MediaMe, Australia’s first-ever national news and media conference for children held over 19-20 November. The conference was a series of workshops around media literacy, debate and the launch of original research into children’s media literacy by Western Sydney University and Queensland University of Technology. Other partners included facebook, Google NewsLab, BlueChilli, and Bangarra Dance Theatre Australia. The museum’s involvement included the development of a card game based on media literacy values used as part of the facilitated sessions, and capturing audio content for use at the museum in PlayUp and online.

The Behind the Lines travelling exhibition continues to engage with smaller regional towns and galleries, each time creating new events and connections.

Finance and governance

In 2016, Old Parliament House was reclassified, under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, as a corporate Commonwealth entity. This has enabled us to generate and retain revenue. While our philanthropic and private sector support is still in its infancy, sponsorship and grant income increased to $0.47 million in 2017–18, and our other self-generated income rose to $2 million, up from $1.33 million in 2016–17.

The museum continues to fulfil all its corporate and governance obligations. We have a strong and independent board with relevant skills that oversees the strategy, governance, risk and budgetary management of the organisation.

Challenges and opportunities

After undertaking a needs analysis for the future we have developed a 20-year master plan for the building that provides a framework for growth that is true to both our heritage values and our future needs. The plan incorporates a thorough refurbishment across the site, and the proposed addition of a new wing to provide a contemporary, flexible space that will contribute to the museum’s accessibility, efficiency and capacity to properly tell the stories of Australia’s democratic journey and its evolution into the future, while complementing the heritage building.

Ms Daryl Karp

Ms Daryl Karp, Director

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank:

Daryl Karp's signature

Ms Daryl Karp
Director

What could be done to strengthen our democracy?
Top 10 most frequently mentioned responses:
Make 'civics' a compulsory subject from primary school onwards

Report on performance

Don’t get me wrong, we need democracy. And I know and respect the fact lots of Australians have died for what we have today. What did someone once say: Churchill or someone? Probably got it wrong but “democracy is the worst form of government except for all the others?” Problem is that it’s out of touch with the people. We can’t get excited about it because it doesn’t work for us. Australian democracy is out of touch.

FIRST-TIME VOTER, NEW AUSTRALIAN

Annual performance statements

The Board, as the accountable authority of Old Parliament House, presents the 2017–18 annual performance statements of Old Parliament House, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). In the Board’s opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of Old Parliament House, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Purpose

The Old Parliament House Corporate Plan 2017–18 sets out one purpose for the entity:

To provide an enriched understanding and appreciation of Australia’s political legacy and the intrinsic value of our democracy.

This purpose was achieved through a single outcome set out for the entity in the Communications and the Arts Portfolio Budget Statements 2017–18.

Outcome 1

An enhanced appreciation and understanding of the political and social heritage of Australia for members of the public, through activities including the conservation and upkeep of, and the provision of access to, Old Parliament House and the development of its collections, exhibitions and educational programs.

Old Parliament House achieved its purpose through four key deliverables, as set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements:

Results

Table 1 details Old Parliament House’s performance against the key performance measures set out for 2017–18 in the Corporate Plan (pages 11–12) and Portfolio Budget Statements (page 251).

Overall, the figures demonstrate that Old Parliament House is working within its resources to manage its assets, develop its collection and deliver a range of relevant and accessible points of engagement with the Australian public.

  1. Results for key performance indicators, 2017–18

    Indicator

    Target

    Result

    Visitor interactions

    Total number of visits to the organisation (excluding students)

    260,000

    266,918

    Total number of visits to the organisation’s website

    480,000

    491,749

    Participation in public and school programs

    Number of people participating in public programs

    38,500

    77,558

    Number of students participating in school programs on site

    74,500

    77,779

    Number of students participating in school programs off site

    10,000

    18,139

    Number of educational institutions participating in organised school learning programs

    1,430

    1,565

    Visitor satisfaction

    Percentage of visitors who were satisfied or very satisfied with their visit

    90%

    93%

    Program survey rating (by teachers)

    Percentage of teachers reporting overall positive experience

    95%

    97%

    Percentage of teachers reporting relevance to the classroom curriculum

    95%

    98%

    Collection management and access

    Number of acquisitions (made in the reporting period)

    374

    393

    Number of objects accessioned (in the reporting period)

    187

    905

    Percentage of the total collection available to the public

    30%

    24%

    Percentage of the total collection digitised

    90%

    81%

    Analysis

    Visitor numbers

    In 2017–18, the museum experienced its highest ever visitor numbers for school programs, reflecting a 6 per cent increase compared to the previous year, as shown in Table 2.

  2. Trends in annual visitor numbers

    2015–16

    2016–17

    2017–18

    Change from 2016–17 to 2017–18

    no.

    %

    Onsite activities

    Programs and exhibitions:

    • school programs

    81,074

    80,183

    84,991

    4,808

    6

    • museum visitors

    181,430

    204,7771

    185,842

    –18,935

    –9

    Catering

    59,318

    74,736

    73,864

    –872

    –1

    Total onsite visitors

    321,822

    359,696

    344,697

    –14,999

    –4

    Outreach and travelling programs

    35,214

    92,031

    168,747

    76,712

    83

    Total visitors

    357,036

    451,727

    513,444

    61,717

    14

    1 The figures for 2016–17 have been adjusted down by 36,655. This relates to a formula error identified in last year’s figures involving attendance for Enlighten.

    In total, 1,565 schools participated in 2,251 onsite programs. In feedback surveys, 97 per cent of teachers reported that their experience had been positive and 98 per cent reported that the museum’s programs were relevant to their classroom curriculum.

    A visitor survey conducted in King’s Hall in 2017–18 provided valuable insights into the museum’s visitors. Of the visitors surveyed, 54 per cent reported that they had visited the museum before (up from 47.5 per cent last year) and 80 per cent said that their knowledge of democracy had increased as a result of their visit.

    Overall museum visitation was lower in 2017–18 than in 2016–17, primarily because:

    Catering numbers were slightly down, but began improving towards the end of the year.

    The increase in participation in outreach can be attributed to three factors: the live broadcast of Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference; the trial of the new digital classroom; and the pilot of Card Castle as a possible outreach program.

    Online interactions

    In 2017–18, visits to the museum’s websites increased by 15.2 per cent, as shown in Table 3.

    This increase can be attributed to:

    Website page views increased slightly, by 1.6 per cent. In November 2017, a new home page was launched for the museum’s main website. This redevelopment allowed more content to be featured on the homepage and grouped content by target audiences, thereby providing users with a more direct path to the content of interest to them. Increased traffic from search engines also suggests that users went directly to the content they were searching for, with less reliance on the homepage as a gateway, thereby reducing the number of web pages viewed per visit.

  3. Trends in website visits

    2015–16

    2016–17

    2017–18

    Change from 2016–17 to 2017–18

    no.

    %

    Website visits

    424,244

    426,804

    491,749

    64,945

    15.2

    Web page views

    985,116

    933,213

    948,324

    15,111

    1.6

    Collection management

  4. Trends in collection management

    2015–16

    2016–17

    2017–18

    Change from 2016–17 to 2017–18

    no.

    %

    Collection objects

    25,039

    26,422

    27,424

    1,002

    3.8

    % of collection available to the public online

    2

    2

    2

    0

    0

    Between 2015–16 and 2017–18, the museum did not add listings for any museum or heritage collection items to its website, because of a lack of resources. The number of collection items available online did not change in that period, as shown in Table 4.

    Achievements

    The following sections describe how we achieved the strategic priorities set out in our Corporate Plan for 2017–18.

    Strategic priority 1: Enriched experiences

    To provide a physical and digital space for important stories, enriched experiences and conversations; to celebrate and collaborate with audiences around our democratic traditions.

    In 2017–18, the museum delivered four exhibitions and 49 participatory events and public programs, which collectively offered multiple points of connection and engagement for diverse audiences.

    Exhibitions, events and tours

    Our exhibitions, events and engagement activities provide physical and digital spaces in which our audiences can explore and celebrate Australia’s democratic traditions through stories, enriched experiences and conversations. Our program for 2017–18 offered a suite of engaging experiences that took place on site, online and in the wider community.

    Particular highlights of our onsite exhibitions included:

    Behind the Lines, our series of onsite and travelling exhibitions celebrating the role of political cartoonists, continues to be very popular. A pop-up version of Behind the Lines 2017: The Three-ring Circus, held at the Canberra Theatre Centre, attracted more than 7,300 visitors.

    Our annual The Great Easter Egg Trail event for families also attracted large audiences. In 2017–18, this event successfully utilised ticketing and timed entry for the first time at the museum, which enhanced the visitor experience by reducing crowding in pressure points around the building.

    A unique experience for invited guests, Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference, combined several strategic objectives in one event. While showcasing the museum and our programs to key stakeholders, it provided an opportunity to create a network of leaders and thinkers with an interest in democracy and generated data for our upcoming exhibition Democracy. Are You In?

    Seven new tours were developed and launched in 2017–18, including two After Dark experiences—a refreshed Ghost Hunters tour and the new Top Secret Tour with Tim the Yowie Man. The first Top Secret tour, held during the Canberra and Region Heritage Festival, generated significant media coverage for the museum.

    Restaurant Associates continued its partnership with the museum, providing a high-quality catering and hospitality experience for visitors.

    A young visitor to Card Castle, our hands-on exhibition during Canberra’s annual Enlighten festival, which set a record for attendance of more than 17,800 visitors over four nights.

    A young visitor to Card Castle, our hands-on exhibition during Canberra’s annual Enlighten festival, which set a record for attendance of more than 17,800 visitors over four nights. Photo by: Rebecca Selleck

    Online presence

    While an increasingly saturated and volatile social media landscape decreased our online reach (the number of users who see our content), the number of users engaging with our content across all our platforms has grown compared to 2016–17. Users are commenting, sharing and liking our content in larger numbers than ever before across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. This is the result of adapting our approach to social media and refining online content creation processes to be more audience driven, responsive to topical issues and focused on producing authentic, original content that is participatory, conversational, playful and rich in stories.

    Wherever possible, we create online experiences to complement or amplify onsite experiences.

    Highlights from 201718 included:

    The museum’s digital infrastructure program commenced during 2017–18. This broad program of work will transform our digital infrastructure and the museum experience. The program, to be rolled out in 2018–19, will establish a robust, scalable and sustainable digital infrastructure base that will serve as the museum’s digital backbone into the future, enabling enhanced visitor experiences, strategic management of data and improved operational efficiencies.

    Strategic priority 2: Schools learning

    To be a nationally recognised conduit for civics and citizenship learning and ideas by providing programs and research that contribute to the extended conversations about democracy.

    During 2017–18, a record number of 84,991 students and teachers from across 1,565 educational institutions participated in our school learning programs. The most highly represented groups were years 5 and 6.

    In 2017–18, we conducted intensive research and evaluation with teachers around Australia to share their insights into the concept of transformative learning, their professional development needs, and the digital landscapes of their classrooms. We learned that future growth in our programs will come from teacher professional development, outreach learning models and partnerships with targeted providers.

    To achieve that growth, we have been:

    Our first digital excursion program for primary school students, Democracy, Media and Me, reached more than 500 students in 2017–18 through schools around Australia. A digital excursion program for secondary schools, which examines Australian rights and freedoms and aims to engage students as active citizens, is in development.

    We are also utilising our digital studio technology to create curriculum-aligned digital resources for teachers’ professional development. These include the Curator on the Couch series, in which museum staff share their expertise on collection items in our exhibitions, and the Stories from the Bunker series, which explores individual objects that are relevant to the curriculum but are not currently on display.

    Google Analytics research shows that the most popular online resources from our learning programs are Getting it Together, which relates to Federation, and Political Cartooning, which explores the Behind the Lines exhibition. During 2017–18, we worked on consolidating existing online content and web pages and developing new online products, including booklists, crosswords, and a democracy song resource for primary schools.

    Our programs continue to evolve and adapt to our changing audience base, with an emphasis on co-creating experiences and encouraging partnerships that focus on twenty-first century thinking skills. New activities piloted in 201718 included:

    Delivering Democracy, Media and Me—our first digital excursion program for students who are not able to visit the museum

    Delivering Democracy, Media and Me—our first digital excursion program for students who are not able to visit the museum. Photo by: MoAD Learning

    Strategic priority 3: The place

    To communicate the spirit of Old Parliament House as a significant national heritage place and ensure that the building and heritage collections are conserved for future generations.

    The museum is the custodian of the iconic Old Parliament House building and is responsible for maintaining it in line with its heritage status and values.

    In 2017–18, we met that responsibility through the conservation, care and sustainable use of the building and its nationally significant collections. Those activities also contributed to our long-term understanding of how to best utilise the national heritage of Old Parliament House, addressing issues of values, access and collection management, to provide for a vibrant museum in the future.

    The museum continued to provide strong messages to each visiting school group through the use of white gloves and discussion of the significance of the building.

    Capital works

    All capital works activities in Old Parliament House are managed to ensure that heritage values are maintained while improving the amenity and accessibility of the building.

    A new three-year capital works program commenced in 2017–18. The first year was productive: planning and procurement activities were undertaken and several projects were completed.

    Key works in exhibition spaces included:

    In addition, a number of maintenance and ICT activities were undertaken during 2017–18, such as upgrades to a range of equipment and facilities, including server switches, laptops, catering equipment, and the fit-out of the staff amenities room.

    A refresh of the PlayUp space was undertaken as part of capital works

    A refresh of the PlayUp space was undertaken as part of capital works. Photo by: Chris Starr

    Preservation projects

    The House of Representatives central carpet was the latest project in our ongoing management of the significant floor surfaces and coverings in Old Parliament House, which aims to preserve heritage coverings in place and in good condition for as long as possible. A hand-tufted, synthetic loop-pile carpet was produced and laid over the heritage carpet. The design of the protective carpet replicates the May Gibbs inspired gum leaf and gum nut patterns of the pre-1988 carpet.

    Other heritage projects in 2017–18 included the following:

    In 2017, we received a National Trust ACT Heritage Award for our outstanding contribution to ACT heritage for the Playing the Long Game project. The project demonstrated the importance of preventive conservation approaches to heritage management and highlighted the strong partnership between our heritage, learning and visitor experience specialists that has secured the ongoing accessibility and interpretation of the House of Representatives and Senate chambers.

    Brass fittings, such as door handles, were cleaned, recoated with lacquer and given a protective coating of wax

    Brass fittings, such as door handles, were cleaned, recoated with lacquer and given a protective coating of wax. Photo by: Andrew Merry

    Collection development

    The museum’s collection captures the ideas, movements, individuals and events of Australia’s democracy. Currently, 6,720 of the total 27,424 items in the Heritage Collection and the Political and Parliamentary Collection are available to the public via exhibitions and room re-creations, online, and through loans to other institutions.

    Collecting is informed by the museum’s Collection Development Plan and conducted in consultation with key stakeholders and board members. The plan arranges the collection into three subcategories:

    Donations are a significant source for collection development. For generously donating to our collection in 2017–18, we thank His Excellency General the Hon Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd); the Hon Dr Barry Jones AC; the Hon John Howard OM AC; Mr Chris Puplick AM; the Hon Gary Gray AO; Mr Nick Xenophon; Mr Tim Wilson MP; the Hon Tim Fischer AC; Senator Louise Pratt; Senator Richard Di Natale; the Hon Warren Entsch MP; Ms Cathy McGowan AO MP; Mrs Isobel Smith; Mr Gary Brown; Ms Shay Ryan; Mr Dennis Grant; Mr Neil Baker; Mr David Rowe; Mrs Carmel Molony; Mr John Cure; Mr Brian Costar; Mr Ken Begg and Ms Merrelin Robbins.

    During 2017–18, the museum acquired 393 items for the Heritage Collection and the Political and Parliamentary Collection. Some notable additions to the Political and Parliamentary Collection are listed in Table 5.

  5. Key additions to the collections, 2017–18

    Collecting category

    Items

    Development of democracy and the systems of Australia’s federal government

    A toy koala given by Arthur Calwell to Isobel Saxelby, the 100,000th British immigrant to Australia, in 1949

    Three miner’s rights issued to women in the Victorian goldfields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries

    The dress uniform worn by South Australian senator Egerton Lee Batchelor to the coronation of George V in 1911, with associated photos, letters and other documents

    Eight artworks shown in the Bald Archy Prize exhibition between 2010 and 2017, some of which feature Australian prime ministers as their subjects

    Quilt of Hope, a quilt made by residents of Ballarat in response to the issue of child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church

    Items owned by former press gallery journalist Ken Begg, including a Chinese newspaper recording Gough Whitlam’s 1973 visit to China, press passes and other items

    The Emperor’s New Clothes, a 2017 sculpture by David Rowe

    Prime ministers

    An Uma Timor ornament (a pagoda on stilts), given to John Howard in 2002 when he visited East Timor as prime minister

    An election advertising card for Joseph Cook from the early 1900s

    A letter signed by Arthur Fadden on 14 June 1953

    Table 5: Key additions to the collections, 2017–18 (continued)

    Collecting category

    Items

    Political influencers and movements

    Items relating to Neville Bonner, including a teapot, cup and saucer that he used in his Parliament House office, a tobacco tin, and papers relating to a 1975 flight on Concorde

    Electoral ephemera relating to the Nick Xenophon Team, including corflutes and t-shirts

    A Lee–Enfield .303 rifle from 1918, which belonged to Tim Fischer and was one of the first to be licensed under the 1996 National Firearms Agreement

    A rainbow flag signed by senators who sponsored the Marriage Amendment (Definition and Religious Freedoms) Bill 2017

    Electoral ephemera from Cathy McGowan’s campaign in 2013, including a t-shirt, a doorknocking kit and handmade apparel

    The timber pen used by Peter Cosgrove to give assent to the Marriage Amendment (Definition and Religious Freedoms) Act 2017

    Letters and other documents relating to the life and career of Barry Jones, including his 30-year correspondence with Gough Whitlam

    Old Parliament House

    Twelve building plans of Old Parliament House, showing television and audio cabling and telecom tech office locations circa 1970

    Items owned by John Cure, who was director of removals for the move from the old to the new parliament house in 1988, including a safety helmet, a photo album, identification passes and letters

    Strategic priority 4: Our organisational culture

    To build a culture and capabilities that enable us to ensure ongoing relevance and financial sustainability.

    A workforce that is efficient, motivated and empowered

    The museum provides a range of learning and development opportunities for museum staff and volunteers.

    In 2017–18, the learning and development program began in July 2017 with 19 staff members attending Indigenous cultural awareness training designed to give them an understanding of the range of Australian Indigenous cultures and how they could apply cross-cultural principles more broadly in their work. Feedback from the staff who attended the training was overwhelmingly positive.

    The museum participated in a number of cross-agency staff development programs, giving staff an opportunity to form relationships with people in other institutions, enhancing staff members’ professional networks and career prospects, and resulting in the sharing of knowledge and experience across multiple institutions. The programs included:

    Each year, all staff members are required to attend training in finance, security, heritage, and hostile intruder awareness to update their knowledge of the issues and their own responsibilities. Mandatory training commenced in February 2018.

    The Executive Level 1 Leadership Group of the museum worked with an external provider to develop a series of leadership masterclasses on topics identified by members of the group. The masterclasses, which were held during the first half of the financial year, were highly successful and attracted more than 20 participants.

    The Workplace Consultative Committee, which meets four times a year, provided a forum for consultation on organisational change and other issues in 2017–18.

    The museum benchmarks and measures staff satisfaction levels each year, following the release of the annual Australian Public Service Commission State of the service report. In 2017–18, the museum’s survey indicated that staff engagement continued to be high at all levels across the museum.

    Financial sustainability

    Long-term financial sustainability is a key focus for Old Parliament House. Since becoming a corporate Commonwealth entity in 2016, Old Parliament House has generated revenue from new sources, enabling it to invest in its strategic priorities.

    In 2017–18, Old Parliament House generated $2.476 million in own-source income, a 40 per cent increase from 2016–17, and received more than $18 million in government funding for the operations of the museum and the ongoing costs associated with preserving the national heritage building.

    In 2017–18, the own-source revenue was generated by:

    Government funding is directed towards key operational priorities and important capital works for the preservation of the building. Internal governance structures ensure that the funding is used for activities that contribute to the museum’s longevity.

    Enabling systems

    The museum’s new point of sale and ticketing system, Roller Digital, began operating in July 2017. The new system made it possible for the museum to improve the experience of visitors arriving at the building, in keeping with growing visitor expectations. Visitors attending events and tours at the museum can now book and pay online, and use their tickets (on their phone or printed) to expedite their entry at the museum.

    The museum also established a second visitor reception area in the lower gallery, a major pathway into the museum. In this area, Roller Digital’s retail functions have enabled the museum to offer an opportunity for visitors to shop as part of their experience of the museum, as requested by visitors in the past. The system is also used to offer visitors a way to opt in to the museum’s e-news as part of the user journey for ticketing.

    The implementation of Roller Digital also facilitated the museum’s first and successful use of timed entry for a mass event—The Great Easter Egg Trail—in April 2018. All available tickets to the event were taken up online for nine timed trail sessions. External evaluation found that this approach resolved crowding and long queues, resulting in significant quality and safety benefits.

    Roller Digital allows us to understand much more about our visitors, which in turn will help inform the development of new museum experiences.

    Case studies

    Case Study

    PlayUP: The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard

    Our award winning children’s exhibition PlayUP is an experiential environment for democratic engagement in which children have agency to make, learn and grow.

    The third iteration of the exhibition, PlayUP: The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard, explores Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in a reimagined, colourful and highly interactive environment.

    Survey feedback from over 5,500 families helped to inform the current version of PlayUP, and regular school holiday programs provided opportunities to test ideas and content with young people. A key goal of the redeveloped exhibition was to provide enhanced opportunities for engagement for diverse groups, including non-English speakers and people with disability, keeping children’s voices always central.

    The graphic style of the exhibition is bold and sophisticated, appealing not just to the younger audience but also to older children and adults. The engagement experiences include:

    A suite of mini-guide publications enhances the engagement activities, encouraging older children to participate and providing adults with the learning objectives and curricula outcomes from Belonging, Being and Becoming—The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia.

    PlayUP: The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard received a Museums and Galleries National Award for its fit-out in 2018.

    PlayUP: The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard explores Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in a reimagined, colourful and highly interactive environmentPlayUP: The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard explores Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in a reimagined, colourful and highly interactive environment

    PlayUP: The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard explores Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in a reimagined, colourful and highly interactive environment. Photo by: Chris Starr

    Case Study

    Behind the Lines: The Year’s Best Political Cartoons

    Behind the Lines: The Year’s Best Political Cartoons is a well-established annual exhibition that celebrates free speech and identifies the important role that Australia’s political cartoonists play in our democracy. Each year, cartoonists look behind the lines of the daily political happenings to capture the spirit of our democracy in all its passion, scepticism and humour.

    One of the challenges of Behind the Lines is narrowing down the prolific cartoons of the year to a selection of about 90 cartoons. The 2017 selection represented the work of 28 cartoonists.

    Under the banner of The Three-ring Circus, the exhibition captured a cavalcade of political characters and plenty of sensational events that seized the imagination of cartoonists and entertained the public. A visitor remarked, ‘I don’t know whether to laugh or cry!’

    David Rowe, cartoonist for The Australian Financial Review, was named Cartoonist of the Year 2017. His cartoon featured United States President Donald Trump in a balancing act with Australian parliamentary figures Tony Abbott, Barnaby Joyce, Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten.

    The exhibition’s display at Old Parliament House is one of the museum’s key attractions, and many visitors return each year to see the latest suite of cartoons.

    Behind the Lines also travels to regional venues, supported by the National Collecting Institutions Touring and Outreach Program, an Australian Government program that aims to improve access to the national collections for all Australians. Behind the Lines 2017 travelled to six venues around Australia, providing outreach opportunities for the museum and championing a cornerstone of democracy: free speech.

    The museum has entered into a three-year partnership with the Australian Cartoonists’ Association that will see us build stronger ties with Australian cartoonists through support for the association’s Stanley Awards and annual conference. In 2017, the museum hosted a lunch with guest speaker Ann Telnaes, a Pulitzer Prize winning editorial cartoonist from The Washington Post. Ann’s talk is accessible via the museum’s website.

    Director Daryl Karp with Cartoonist of the Year 2017 David Rowe and his Behind the Lines entry

    Director Daryl Karp with Cartoonist of the Year 2017 David Rowe and his Behind the Lines entry. Photo by: Mark Nolan

    Case Study

    Card Castle

    Each year, as part of Canberra’s Enlighten festival, we look for creative new ways to inspire visitors to contribute their voices to our conversation about democratic engagement through unique large-scale installations. In 2018, museum staff and visitors co-created Card Castle, a visual metaphor of the strength and fragility of the democratic system.

    Card Castle was constructed using thousands of individual cardboard shapes, each containing a single printed word—hope, courage, trust, community, diversity, curiosity or kindness. These words were chosen to elicit personal stories and reflections illustrating the diversity and resilience of our democratic society. Each visitor was invited to select a word and, by writing or drawing on the cardboard shape, respond to that word with a personal story that highlighted the best of our shared humanity.

    Visitors were also encouraged to help us build Card Castle, connecting individual stories together as a symbol of the power of communities. Card Castle was built in real time within King’s Hall—perhaps our most iconic heritage space—to convey the museum’s core belief that the visitor’s voice is central to a healthy democracy.

    Participating in Card Castle was an act of civic engagement, a poignant exercise at a time when trust in democracy around the world is under threat. As the Card Castle structure grew, it reinforced the metaphor that public participation contributes to strong and resilient communities.

    The activity was well received by visitors, and school and community groups have since embraced the Card Castle concept in their programming.

    The unique large-scale participatory exhibition Card Castle, held over four nights during Canberra’s annual Enlighten festival, drew a record 17,827 visitors

    The unique large-scale participatory exhibition Card Castle, held over four nights during Canberra’s annual Enlighten festival, drew a record 17,827 visitors. Photo by: Chris Starr

    Case Study

    Collection storage relocation

    During 2017–18, our heritage and collections team undertook a major project to relocate collection objects stored in the undercroft of the House of Representatives chamber in order to make the space available for a new exhibition.

    Collection items stored in the undercroft included significant upholstered and timber furniture, architectural fragments, fittings and textiles, all from the Heritage Collection. In total, 2,800 objects were relocated.

    Extensive planning was undertaken to provide the highest possible level of collection care, including handling and security, object tracking and management of environmental conditions during the move and for the long term at the new storage location.

    We took the opportunity to inspect the collection prior to relocation, to mitigate any risks associated with the condition of the objects, such as structural damage, or evidence of insect activity. Almost 800 objects were inspected, cleaned and conserved in preparation for relocation. A number of items received a precautionary treatment for pests, through a process of freezing, before being rehoused.

    We designed and built custom handling equipment for several very large, heavy pieces of furniture to ensure that they could safely be transported out of the space and onto a truck for delivery offsite.

    Collection storage onsite and at Fyshwick was consolidated to maximise suitable spaces, based on collection types and object significance, to accommodate the extra storage requirement.

    Making the undercroft available as an exhibition space will increase visitor access to this part of the building and open it up for an immersive visitor experience in a unique heritage space.

    2,800 objects were relocated from the undercroft of the House of Representatives chamber

    2,800 objects were relocated from the undercroft of the House of Representatives chamber. Photo by: Andrew Merry

    Case Study

    Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference

    Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference brought together 100 Australian leaders, innovators and thinkers to celebrate Australia’s democratic achievements and establish the case for democratic renewal.

    These ‘champions of democracy’ were selected to represent several generations and a wide range of sectors, including business, politics, the media, arts and culture, education, the military, philanthropy and the professions.

    The evening began with an interview with former prime ministers Bob Hawke and John Howard, conducted by political journalist Annabel Crabb and broadcast live by the ABC. The conversation firmly established the bipartisan nature of the event and offered insights into some of the characteristics of political leadership and democratic engagement in Australia.

    Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference included a card game that challenged groups to work together to rank Australia’s most important democratic values and decide what the responsibilities of a champion of Australian democracy might be

    Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference included a card game that challenged groups to work together to rank Australia’s most important democratic values and decide what the responsibilities of a champion of Australian democracy might be. Photo by: Chalk Studio

    Over dinner, the guests joined in a card game that challenged groups to work together to rank Australia’s most important democratic values and decide what the responsibilities of a champion of Australian democracy might be and what might be included in a charter of democracy. The game was designed by the Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis at the University of Canberra, drawing on specially commissioned research into trust and community attitudes to our public institutions.

    Held in the evocative settings of King’s Hall and the Members’ Dining Room, Democracy 100 was an example of the museum’s capacity to create and deliver multi-generational, transformative experiences that promote participation in the conversation about the current state of democracy in Australia and possible ways to advance it.

    As well as establishing a network for further discussion and possible cooperation between the champions, it helped to strengthen the museum’s relationships with the institute and the ABC and initiate opportunities for future partnerships.

    ‘Having Annabel interview the wise old men—hearing their perspectives was truly unique and most instructive. And the card game was an inspired way for people to contribute more substantively.’ Democracy 100 participant

    ‘I definitely gained immense experience from the Democracy 100 dinner ... I was able to share my own opinions as well as take on the wisdom of those surrounding me. As a young 20-year-old with the world ahead, it gave me such confidence that I could make an impact just like those around me.’ Student, Australian National Youth Forum

    During Democracy 100, an interview with former prime ministers the Hon John Howard OM AC and the Hon Bob Hawke AC GCL was conducted by Annabel Crabb and broadcast live by the ABC

    During Democracy 100, an interview with former prime ministers the Hon John Howard OM AC and the Hon Bob Hawke AC GCL was conducted by Annabel Crabb and broadcast live by the ABC. Photo by: Chalk Studio

    Case Study

    Democracy, Media and Me

    Democracy, Media and Me, the museum’s first digital outreach program for primary school students, was launched in February 2018. Through this innovative and exciting program, students who cannot physically visit the museum are able to join our conversation about Australian democracy by virtually exploring and interacting with historical spaces and objects, guided by trained museum staff and structured learning objectives.

    Research into the learning potential of digital excursions has shown that teachers are very open to using digital excursions to enhance their classroom teaching, and that the necessary technologies are fast becoming more readily available in schools.

    Communicating across digital technologies can be challenging for teachers and school communities. To understand these challenges and minimise the barriers, we developed and tested a variety of presentation techniques and resources to engage students and their teachers. Students were able to examine stories connected to Old Parliament House through collection items, audio clips, moving footage and images of heritage spaces. For teachers, we delivered a new digital outreach professional learning program, Curator on the Couch.

    Already, more than 500 students in their own classrooms have successfully participated in activities and discussions, engaged with the building and collections, and learned about how they can make a difference in their democracy. The Canberra Hospital School has established a strong partnership with the museum to provide monthly connections for students in its care.

    We are investigating other ways in which digital technology can enhance the museum’s outreach, particularly to regional, rural and remote areas, to expand our audience and achieve our strategic priorities for schools learning.

    ‘I was so stoked after today’s experience! It was so informative, a great learning experience and so exciting to think about future possibilities with learning this way. The students loved it as well.’ Shauna, teacher, Mater Dei Primary School, Toowoomba, Queensland

    ‘I liked how we could interact with the presenters and we could be where we couldn’t normally be only through a video in the classroom.’ Year 6 student, Aranda Primary School, ACT

    ‘I liked that we were able to go to places that we couldn’t go if you went publicly. That it actually moved, you could talk to the people and answer questions and that I got to see the cool and amazing things that I had never seen.’ Year 6 student, Aranda Primary School, ACT

    Democracy, Media and Me, the museum’s first digital outreach program for primary school students

    Photo by: MoAD Learning

    Case Study

    History in the making

    As vital ideas and events emerge in contemporary Australian democracy, the museum selectively adds to its collections to ensure that those moments are preserved in our cultural heritage.

    The 2017 Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey was such an historic moment, involving some of the fundamental ingredients of Australian democracy, including civil rights, religious freedom, constitutional law and public plebiscites. The museum selected objects to document the process of change.

    Capturing the energy and passion of activists across the political spectrum was challenging. ‘Yes’ vote campaigners produced a greater quantity and variety of objects, but we also succeeded in gathering ‘No’ material, demonstrating the depth of feeling on the issue.

    We also collected objects from the legislative frontline, as the positive survey outcome was translated into law. These included:

    The collection shows how and why we collect contemporary objects. They tell stories of moments that changed democracy—through personal and professional commitment—that will inform and inspire Australians in years ahead.

    ‘When in the future ... I look at these sneakers I will know change is possible; that if we can achieve justice on this issue there is no reason we cannot achieve justice for so many other Australians.’ Senator Richard Di Natale, 7 December 2017

    Rainbow sneakers, hand-coloured by a reverend’s daughter, worn into the Senate chamber by Senator Richard Di Natale.

    Rainbow sneakers, hand-coloured by a reverend’s daughter, worn into the Senate chamber by Senator Richard Di Natale. Photo by: Mark Nolan

    Case Study

    The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals

    The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals is an onsite exhibition that explores immigration as a personal experience and as an exchange of gifts—immigrants give Australia skills, diversity and prosperity, and in return Australia gives its new citizens freedom, opportunity and democracy.

    This exchange of gifts is explored through the stories of British and European immigrants after World War II. The exhibition includes a display of significant historical objects, including a toy koala given to six-year-old Isobel Saxelby in 1949 by Immigration Minister Arthur Calwell, to celebrate her arrival as Australia’s 100,000th British immigrant.

    The exhibition also showcases thought-provoking and moving artworks by Linde Ivimey, Hedy Ritterman, Lousje Skala and Linda Wachtel—contemporary artists who are family members of Holocaust survivors who immigrated to Australia.

    Visitors to the exhibition are invited to reflect on the stories told by these poignant objects and to contribute their own stories by drawing or writing a message on a postcard to a new immigrant to Australia. Since the exhibition was launched in September 2017, several hundred members of the public have penned thoughtful and often personal messages, some of which will be presented to new citizens at citizenship ceremonies.

    In a short film commissioned by the museum, the artists read and respond to some of the messages and stories written by visitors, many of which resonate with the stories told in their own artworks.

    Through the sharing of stories, The Gift provides a truly transformative and empowering experience for museum visitors and the wider community.

    ‘It doesn’t matter who you are, what colour you are, what religion you believe in, what story you have brought here, as long as you have a good heart and the will to do good, you are welcomed.’ From a postcard written by a visitor to The Gift

    A toy koala given to six-year-old Isobel Saxelby in 1949 by Immigration Minister Arthur Calwell

    A toy koala given to six-year-old Isobel Saxelby in 1949 by Immigration Minister Arthur Calwell.
    Photo by: Stefan Postles

    Case Study

    New stories in old spaces

    The museum’s guided tours are informative and stimulating opportunities for visitors to immerse themselves in the atmosphere of the building and stories of the people who have inhabited it.

    Seven new tours were launched in 2017–18, including the Indigenous Experiences of Democracy tour and the After Dark experiences Ghost Hunters and Top Secret Tour with Tim the Yowie Man.

    Indigenous Experiences of Democracy, launched during National Reconciliation Week, features stories of how Indigenous men and women and their supporters have used different pathways to bring about change, many of which led them to Old Parliament House, the home of the federal parliament from 1927 to 1988.

    The tour takes visitors through key heritage spaces—including King’s Hall, the Senate chamber, the Prime Minister’s Office and the Press Gallery—telling stories of Indigenous leadership and activism that happened in those spaces, and encouraging visitors to share their own thoughts and memories.

    The tour was developed in response to visitors’ requests to know more about Indigenous experiences in Australia, with input from the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and occupants of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy.

    The After Dark tours communicate authentic historical material by the eerie glow of torchlight. In the Ghost Hunters tour, participants join with guides to explore the building and play a ‘last man standing’ game as they hear tales of deaths and other mysterious occurrences.

    The Top Secret tour, launched during the Canberra and Region Heritage Festival 2018, is a partnership between the museum and journalist and tour leader Tim the Yowie Man. The two-hour tour offers visitors in-depth engagement with ‘secrets’ about the building and incidents which have occurred here.

    All sessions of the After Dark experiences sold out during 2017–18, and the audience for radio, web and print media stories associated with the tours is estimated at more than 1.7 million.

    The Old Parliament House

    ‘I love this building whenever I visit. It’s spacious and majestic. In the dark of night it is even more so.’ Karen Hardy, The Canberra Times, 2 November 2017. Photo by: Andrew Merry

    Why do you think there has been a steady decline in citizen trust in our governments since 2007?
Top 10 most frequently mentioned responses:
Lack of action by governments of all persuation on key public policy problems.

    Governance

    Keeping your word. That’s a big thing with me. Don’t tell me you’re going to do something and not do it because I’ll never trust you again.

    ELDERLY REGIONAL AUSTRALIAN

    Organisation

    Old Parliament House was established as a corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Establishing Old Parliament House) Rule 2016, with the following functions:

    The purpose of the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House is to provide an enriched understanding and appreciation of Australia’s political legacy and the intrinsic value of our democracy.

    As well as activities in the heritage building of Old Parliament House in Canberra, the museum conducts outreach activities around Australia and online.

    Responsible minister

    Old Parliament House resides in the Communications and the Arts portfolio and is accountable to the Minister for Communications and the Arts, Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield, who has been the minister since 2015.

    In 2017–18:

    Detail of the Australian Coat of Arms.

    Photo by: Andrew Merry

    Structure

    Figure 1 outlines the structure of the organisation. Old Parliament House had no subsidiaries in 2017–18.

    Figure 1: Organisational structure at 30 June 2018

    Organisational structure at 30 June 2018

    Board

    The Board of Old Parliament House was established under section 13 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Establishing Old Parliament House) Rule 2016.

    Role

    The Board’s functions are to decide the objectives, strategies and policies to be followed by Old Parliament House and to ensure the proper and efficient performance of Old Parliament House’s functions. This role includes:

    The Board also contributes to the museum’s operations by:

    Board members receive a full induction following their appointment and a briefing on their roles and responsibilities at the first meeting of each financial year.

    Members and attendance

    In December 2017, the Board welcomed two new members: Professor Anne Tiernan and Ms Cheryl Cartwright.

    The Board met four times in 2017–18. Table 6 sets out each board member’s attendance during the year, along with details of their qualifications and experience.

  6. Old Parliament House board members, 30 June 2018

    Role

    Name

    Qualifications and experience

    Meetings attended/ eligible to attend

    Chair
    (Non-executive)

    The Hon Dr David Kemp AC

    Educationalist, former member of the House of Representatives and former cabinet minister

    4/4

    Deputy chair
    (Non-executive)

    Mr Bernard Wright AO

    Former Clerk of the House of Representatives

    4/4

    Member
    (Non-executive)

    The Hon Simon Crean

    Former member of the House of Representatives and former cabinet minister

    4/4

    Member
    (Non-executive)

    Professor Anne Tiernan

    Academic and author specialising in public policy, public administration and governance

    3/3

    Member
    (Non-executive)

    Ms Cheryl Cartwright

    Former member of the Canberra press gallery and former secretary to the prime minister

    3/3

    Member
    (Executive)

    Ms Daryl Karp

    Director of the Museum of Australian Democracy

    4/4

    Related entity transactions

    During 2017–18, there were no related entity transactions as defined under section 17BE of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014.

    Audit committee

    The Board has one committee, the Audit Finance and Risk Committee, which oversees audit activity and the adequacy of internal controls, including risk management. This role includes:

    The Audit Finance and Risk Committee is directly accountable to the Board.

    In 2017–18, the committee met four times and considered the progress and outcomes of external and internal audit reviews. The committee acted in accordance with its role and obligations under the Old Parliament House Audit Finance and Risk Committee Charter.

    Executive

    The Director is responsible for:

    Ms Daryl Karp joined Old Parliament House as Director in 2013. Previously she was Chief Executive Officer of Film Australia and Head of Factual Television at the ABC. She is a company director of SBS, where she sits on the Audit and Risk Committee; Chair of the Council of Australasian Museum Directors; and a fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

    In 2017, Ms Karp received the ACT Public Sector and Academia Award at the Telstra Business Women’s Awards.

    The Deputy Director leads:

    Mr Andrew Harper joined Old Parliament House as Deputy Director in 2008. He previously worked in senior corporate management roles in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Department of Finance.

    Corporate governance

    To oversee corporate governance and determine strategic priorities, the Director acts in consultation with the Deputy Director and section heads, with input from the Board and executive committees.

    In addition to the Board’s Audit Finance and Risk Committee, which oversees audit activity and the adequacy of internal controls, several key executive committees informed the corporate governance of Old Parliament House in 2017–18, as described in Table 7.

  7. Executive committees, 2017–18

    Name

    Functions

    Executive Management Group

    • Makes key decisions on entity-wide matters
    • Develops strategic planning priorities
    • Oversees risk management
    • Manages and is responsible for the budget
    • Ensures compliance with workplace health and safety obligations

    Senior Management Group

    • Provides a venue for decision-making, consultation and feedback on operational issues
    • Develops and implements internal plans and policies
    • Promotes risk management, regularly reviews and assesses key risks, and ensures appropriate linkages between risk management and planning processes
    • Acts as the security committee and the project management committee

    Heritage Actions Committee

    • Discusses action proposals in accordance with Policy 2.1 of the Heritage Management Plan
    • Makes recommendations for the chair of the committee to consider in their capacity as delegate under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
    • Suggests independent advice where relevant
    • Provides input on proposed actions to ensure that decisions made regarding use and change in and on Old Parliament House and its curtilage will not have a significant adverse impact on the heritage values of the place
    • Reports to the Executive Management Group and the Board on its activities

    Acquisitions Committee

    • Discusses and determines appropriate additions to the collection for approval by the delegate in accordance with Policy 3.3 of the Collection Management Policy
    • Reports to the Executive Management Group and the Board on its activities

    Capital Steering Committee

    • Discusses and endorses the business cases for projects, and any funding variations, which then go to the Executive Management Group for approval
    • Approves off-project plans for relevant projects and ensures the commitment of allocated resources to the projects
    • Monitors the progress of projects and ensures that project targets are being met

    Table 7: Executive committees, 2017–18 (continued)

    Name

    Functions

    Work Health and Safety Committee

    • Oversees health and safety matters
    • Identifies, develops and implements consistent strategies to address work health and safety requirements
    • Reports to and advises employees and the Executive Management Group on relevant matters

    Workplace Consultative Committee

    • Facilitates communication, consultation, cooperation and input from staff on matters that affect the workplace
    • Considers and advises employees and the Executive Management Group on workplace matters referred by employees and employee representatives

    Strategic planning

    A new five-year plan, the Old Parliament House Strategic Framework 2018–23, was developed during 2017–18 after wide-ranging consultation. The new framework was approved by the Board in May.

    The four pillars of our vision—bold, relevant, authentic and dynamic—remain, but the calls to action have changed to enable the organisation to respond to current challenges.

    The Old Parliament House Corporate Plan 2017–18 detailed the strategic priorities, delivery strategies and intended results for each of our core activities. The Corporate Plan and other annual operational plans and policies underpin the five-year strategy and enable Old Parliament House to meet its governance responsibilities and achieve its objectives.

    Ethical standards

    We place a high priority on ensuring a safe, healthy, supportive and productive workplace, preventing discrimination and harassment, and fostering ethical behaviour.

    Our ethical standards are aligned with the Australian Public Service (APS) Values, Employment Principles and Code of Conduct and the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework, and reinforced by our:

    A number of these documents were revised and updated during 2017–18.

    The Client Service Charter is available from the museum’s website and includes a feedback form that can be downloaded or completed online. Overall feedback in 2017–18 was positive and indicated that the museum continued to provide its services to a high standard.

    Reconciliation Action Plan

    In March 2017, a working group was established to carry out the commitments made in the Old Parliament House Reconciliation Action Plan.

    Activities undertaken by the working group in 201718 included:

    Two sessions of cultural awareness training were held for staff and volunteers.

    We are working towards integrating content on Indigenous subjects throughout the museum’s exhibitions and events.

    Risk management

    During 2017–18, Old Parliament House’s Risk Management Policy and Framework was reviewed and updated as required.

    We participated in the annual Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey, achieving an overall risk management maturity rating of ‘Advanced’.

    Fraud control

    Old Parliament House has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the entity, in compliance with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework.

    Fraud is reported as a standing item to the Audit Finance and Risk Committee. No cases of suspected fraud were reported and no investigations were undertaken during the year.

    Insurance and indemnities for officers

    No indemnities applied during the reporting period to the accountable authority, or a member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity, against a liability.

    External scrutiny

    In 2017–18, Old Parliament House was not the subject of any judicial decisions, decisions of administrative tribunals or the Australian Information Commissioner, reports by the Commonwealth Ombudsman or a parliamentary committee, or reports by the Australian National Audit Office other than the audit of our 2017–18 financial statements.

    Work health and safety

    Old Parliament House’s work health and safety (WHS) arrangements are in line with the requirements of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

    Our WHS initiatives include:

    During the reporting period, we had no incidents that were notifiable under section 38 of the Act, and no investigations under Part 10 of the Act were conducted.

    Advertising and market research

    In 2017–18, Old Parliament House paid a total of $36,231 (including GST) to media advertising and market research organisations. No individual payments were above the reporting threshold of $13,200.

    We did not conduct any advertising campaigns within the definitions of the Guidelines on information and advertising campaigns by non-corporate Commonwealth entities. All advertising was for non-campaign purposes and was primarily to publicise the museum’s exhibitions, public programs and other visitor services.

    Ecologically sustainable development

    We plan and conduct our operations in accordance with the principles of ecologically sustainable development set out in the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

    Old Parliament House’s outcome and activities contribute to ecologically sustainable development both by conserving and maintaining unique heritage assets for future generations and by promoting awareness of the economic, environmental, social and equity considerations that have shaped decision-making and development in Australia.

    The heritage values of Old Parliament House are managed under the Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan 2015–2020, which includes the entity’s obligations under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act.

    Our heritage management framework, including the Heritage Management Plan and the Heritage Actions Committee, ensures that the principles of ecologically sustainable development are considered when decisions are made that may affect the heritage values and environment of the building and its surroundings.

    Our Operational Environmental Management Plan provides a framework and recommendations through which we improve environmental management.

    Table 8 lists measures carried out in 2017–18 to minimise the impact of the agency’s activities on the environment.

  8. Environmental measures, 2017–18

    Category

    Measures

    Energy efficiency

    All building operations were effectively managed to achieve optimal energy performance.

    To maximise energy efficiency, the following principles were applied:

    • where practical, purchasing equipment that has an Energy Star standard of four stars or better
    • using energy management options that enable office equipment to power down when not in use
    • not allowing energy-intensive or unapproved electrical items for personal use.

    Other energy-saving measures included:

    • switching off all non-essential lights at appropriate times
    • using curtains or blinds at appropriate times to maximise the effectiveness and efficiency of air-conditioning and heating systems
    • upgrading heating, ventilation and air-conditioning plant
    • installing LED lighting and motion-detecting sensors
    • utilising the building management system and remote monitoring of performance for further improvement.

    Water conservation

    Water-saving measures included:

    • conducting regular inspections and repairs on all heritage taps and cisterns
    • replacing leaking pipes and valves
    • scoping water conservation measures in all new works, having regard to heritage responsibilities
    • undertaking a condition audit of all hydraulic infrastructure.

    Paper use

    Paper use was minimised by using print management software, clearing all print queues daily and having double-sided printing as the default setting.

    Waste

    Recycling facilities were used to minimise the amount of waste going to landfill.

    What do you think the responsibilities of a champion of Australian democracy should be?
Top 10 most frequently mentioned responses:
To make sure that the voices of all Australians are represented.

    Financial statements

    I have a full life. I go at it hard because I want to show everyone that my disability won’t hold me back. Not for one second. It’s partly because of that, that I get the idea about active citizenship. The great thing about Australian democracy is that there are so many ways in which we can participate. But you have to go for it. I am doing democracy differently to most and loving every second.

    AUSTRALIAN WITH DISABILITY

    Summary of financial management and performance

    An unmodified audit report on the 2017–18 financial statements was received from the Australian National Audit Office, with no findings during the year. The notes to the audited financial statements explain the key numbers. In particular, the commentary on variances to budget at Note 3.11 highlights specific events that occurred during the year that affected the results.

    Total income for 2017–18 was $18.535 million (budgeted $17.241 million), and total expenditure, including depreciation, was $18.397 million (budgeted $17.241 million), resulting in an operating surplus of $0.138 million.

    Revenue from government was $16.059 million and included funds received through the Public Service Modernisation Fund—Agency Sustainability measure for critical building works. Income from own sources amounted to $2.476 million; this included gains from donated assets of $0.084 million. The increase in own-source revenue compared to the total for 2016–17 is largely due to additional spaces available for tenants and rental income. Old Parliament House also received equity injections of $2.514 million for the preservation and conservation of its heritage furniture collection, new collection acquisitions and critical capital works.

    On 30 June 2018, cash on hand totalled $6.518 million (the total for 30 June 2017 was $4.505 million) and investments totalled $2.5 million (the total for 30 June 2017 was nil).

    Financial statements

    This section comprises:

    Independent Auditor's Report from the Australian National Audit Office

    Independent Auditor's Report from the Australian National Audit Office

    STATEMENT BY THE BOARD, THE DIRECTOR AND THE CHIEF FINANCIAL Officer

    In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2018 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

    In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe Old Parliament House will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

    This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board.

    David Kemp's signature

    Dr D. Kemp AC
    Chair
    3 September 2018

    Daryl Karp's signature

    Ms. D. Karp
    Director
    3 September 2018

    Rachael Cox's signature

    Ms. R. Cox
    Chief Financial Officer
    3 September 2018

    Statement of Comprehensive Income

    For the period ended 30 June 2018

    2018

    2017

    Original Budget

    Notes

    $’000

    $’000

    $’000

    NET COST OF SERVICES

    Expenses

    Employee Benefits

    3.1A

    7,722

    7,493

    7,595

    Suppliers

    3.1B

    5,681

    5,823

    5,548

    Depreciation and amortisation

    3.4A

    4,988

    5,014

    4,098

    Write-Down and Impairment of Assets

    3.4A

    6

    14

    -

    Total expenses

    18,397

    18,344

    17,241

    Own-Source Income

    Own-source revenue

    Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

    3.2A

    522

    417

    232

    Rental Income

    3.2B

    1,130

    723

    729

    Interest

    214

    94

    -

    Sponsorship and grants

    476

    433

    221

    Other Revenue

    3.2C

    42

    22

    -

    Total own-source revenue

    2,384

    1,689

    1,182

    Gains

    Reversal of write-downs and impairment

    3.4A

    8

    9

    Donations of collection items

    3.2D

    84

    69

    -

    Total gains

    92

    78

    -

    Total own-source income

    2,476

    1,767

    1,182

    Net (cost of)/contribution by services

    (15,921)

    (16,577)

    (16,059)

    Revenue from Government

    3.2E

    16,059

    14,427

    16,059

    Surplus/(Deficit)

    138

    (2,150)

    -

    Total other comprehensive income

    138

    (2,150)

    -

    The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

    Statement of Financial Position

    As at 30 June 2018

     

     

    2018

    2017

    Original Budget

     

    Notes

    $’000

    $’000

    $’000

    ASSETS

    Financial assets

    Cash and Cash Equivalents

    3.3A

    6,518

    4,505

    3,131

    Cash on deposit

    3.3A

    2,500

    -

    -

    Trade and Other Receivables

    3.3B

    408

    287

    241

    Total financial assets

    9,426

    4,792

    3,372

    Non-financial assets

    Heritage and cultural building

    3.4A

    77,342

    79,336

    80,893

    Heritage and cultural collections

    3.4A

    8,089

    7,973

    8,238

    Plant and equipment

    3.4A

    1,591

    1,338

    1,598

    Intangibles

    3.4A

    318

    349

    565

    Inventories

    3.4B

    31

    -

    -

    Prepayments

    48

    29

    13

    Total non-financial assets

    87,419

    89,025

    91,307

    Total assets

    96,845

    93,817

    94,679

    LIABILITIES

    Payables

    Suppliers

    3.5A

    574

    290

    47

    Other Payables

    3.5B

    374

    352

    44

    Total payables

    948

    642

    91

    Provisions

    Employee Provisions

    3.6A

    1,973

    1,903

    1,913

    Total provisions

    1,973

    1,903

    1,913

    Total liabilities

    2,921

    2,545

    2,004

    Net assets

    93,924

    91,272

    92,675

    EQUITY

    Contributed equity

    65,233

    62,719

    68,947

    Reserves

    28,389

    28,389

    28,388

    Retained surplus/(Accumulated deficit)

    302

    164

    (4,660)

    Total equity

    93,924

    91,272

    92,675

    The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

    Statement of Changes in Equity

    For the period ended 30 June 2018

     

     

    2018

    2017

    Original Budget

     

    Notes

    $’000

    $’000

    $’000

    CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

    Balance carried forward from previous period

    62,719

    62,765

    66,433

    Transactions with owners

    Distributions by owners

    Returns of capital

    -

    (3,717)

    -

    Contributions by owners

    Equity injection

    2,514

    3,671

    2,322

    Departmental capital budget

    -

    -

    192

    Total transactions with owners

    2,514

    (46)

    2,514

    Closing balance as at 30 June

    65,233

    62,719

    68,947

    RETAINED EARNINGS

    Balance carried forward from previous period

    164

    2,314

    (4,660)

    Surplus/(Deficit) for the period

    138

    (2,150)

    -

    Closing balance as at 30 June

    302

    164

    (4,660)

    ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

    Balance carried forward from previous period

    28,389

    28,389

    28,388

    Closing balance as at 30 June

    28,389

    28,389

    28,388

    TOTAL EQUITY

    Balance carried forward from previous period

    91,272

    93,468

    90,161

    Comprehensive income

    Surplus/(Deficit) for the period

    138

    (2,150)

    -

    Other comprehensive income

    -

    -

    -

    Total comprehensive income

    138

    (2,150)

    -

    Transactions with owners

    Distributions to owners

    Returns of capital

    -

    (3,717)

    -

    Contributions by owners

    Equity injection

    2,514

    3,671

    2,322

    Departmental capital budget

    -

    -

    192

    Total transactions with owners

    2,514

    (46)

    2,514

    Closing balance as at 30 June

    93,924

    91,272

    92,675

    The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

    Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year. The Financial Reporting Rules require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend.

    Cash Flow Statement

    For the period ended 30 June 2018

     

     

    2018

    2017

    Original Budget

     

    Notes

    $’000

    $’000

    $’000

    OPERATING ACTIVITIES

    Cash received

    Appropriations

    16,059

    14,427

    16,059

    Sale of goods and rendering of services

    667

    435

    1,182

    Rental Income

    1,135

    729

    -

    Net GST received

    640

    697

    -

    Other

    517

    551

    -

    Total cash received

    19,018

    16,839

    17,241

    Cash used

    Employees

    7,809

    7,347

    7,595

    Suppliers

    6,365

    6,611

    5,548

    Total cash used

    14,174

    13,958

    13,143

    Net cash from/(used by) operating activities

    4,844

    2,881

    4,098

    INVESTING ACTIVITIES

    Cash received

    Interest

    214

    94

    -

    Cash used

    Purchase of non-financial assets

    3,059

    2,141

    6,612

    Total cash used

    3,059

    2,141

    6,612

    Net cash from/(used by) investing activities

    (2,845)

    (2,047)

    (6,612)

    FINANCING ACTIVITIES

    Cash received

    Contributed equity

    2,514

    3,671

    2,514

    Total cash received

    2,514

    3,671

    2,514

    Cash used

    Return of equity

    -

    (3,465)

    -

    Cash on deposit

    (2,500)

    Total cash used

    (2,500)

    (3,465)

    -

    Net cash from/(used by) financing activities

    14

    206

    2,514

    Net increase/(decrease) in cash held

    2,013

    1,040

    -

    Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period

    3.3A

    4,505

    3,465

    3,131

    Cash & cash equivalents at end of reporting period

    6,518

    4,505

    3,131

    The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

    Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

    For the period ended 30 June 2018

    Note 1 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies57

    Note 2 – Events After the Reporting Period58

    Note 3.1 – Expenses58

    Note 3.2 – Own Source Revenue60

    Note 3.3 – Financial Assets62

    Note 3.4 – Non Financial Assets63

    Note 3.5 – Payables66

    Note 3.6 – Employee Provisions68

    Note 3.7 – Financial Instruments69

    Note 3.8 – Fair Value Measurement70

    Note 3.9 – Key Management Personnel Remuneration70

    Note 3.10 – Related Party Disclosures71

    Note 3.11 – Variances to Budget Commentary71

    Note 1 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

    1.1. Objectives of OPH

    Old Parliament House (OPH) is a not-for-profit Corporate Commonwealth Entity (CCE). The objectives of OPH are twofold: to conserve Old Parliament House as a significant national heritage site and to deliver the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House.

    OPH is structured to meet one outcome:

    An enhanced appreciation and understanding of the political and social heritage of Australia for members of the public, through activities including the conservation and upkeep of, and the provision of access to, Old Parliament House and the development of its collection, exhibitions and educational programs.

    The continued existence of OPH in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the OPH’s administration and programs.

    1.2. Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

    The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

    The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

    1. Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2017; and
    2. Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

    The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

    The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values and are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars, unless otherwise specified.

    Specific accounting policies can be found in the relevant notes.

    1.3. Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

    In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in these notes, the entity has made judgements on the value of the building and the heritage and cultural assets that significantly impacts on the amounts recorded in the financial statements.

    The fair value of the building has been taken to be the market value, determined by calculating the depreciated replacement value, as determined by an independent valuer. See Note 3.4 for further information.

    The fair value of heritage and cultural assets is based on market observations; however, OPH’s collections are diverse with many objects being iconic with limited markets for comparison. On these items, the professional valuer has made a judgements on value based on their expert knowledge.

    During this financial year OPH has reclassified the building to a ‘Heritage & Cultural asset’. This is on the basis that the building reflects significant cultural heritage of the Australian nation and has satisfactorily met the criteria under the Financial Reporting Rules for Heritage and Cultural classification.

    1.4. Taxation and Competitive Neutrality

    OPH is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

    Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

    Note 2 – Events After the Reporting Period

    OPH had no events occurring after the statement of financial position date requiring disclosure.

    Note 3.1 – Expenses

    3.1A: Employee Benefits

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.1A: Employee Benefits

    Wages and salaries

    5,854

    5,597

    Superannuation

    Defined contribution plans

    702

    751

    Defined benefit plans

    374

    368

    Leave and other entitlements

    792

    777

    Total employee benefits

    7,722

    7,493

    See note 3.6 for accounting policy on Employee Provisions and Superannuation.

    3.1B: Suppliers

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.1B: Suppliers

    Goods and services supplied or rendered

    Consultants

    421

    75

    Professional services

    1,302

    1,476

    Travel

    179

    117

    IT services

    418

    571

    Building services & maintenance

    1,954

    2,356

    Other

    1,126

    960

    Total goods and services supplied or rendered

    5,400

    5,555

    Goods supplied

    298

    243

    Services rendered

    5,102

    5,312

    Total goods and services supplied or rendered

    5,400

    5,555

    Other suppliers

    Operating lease rental in connection with

    Minimum lease payments

    203

    115

    Workers compensation expenses

    78

    153

    Total other suppliers

    281

    268

    Total suppliers

    5,681

    5,823

    Leasing Commitments

    Old Parliament House in its capacity as a lessee has a lease arrangement for warehouse facilities, which is subject to fixed annual increases and a market review according to the terms of the lease agreement. All of the entities leases are operating leases.

    Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

    Within 1 year

    204

    204

    Between 1 to 5 years

    854

    830

    More than 5 years

    779

    1,007

    Total operating lease commitments

    1,837

    2,041

    Note 3.2 – Own Source Revenue

    3.2A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.2A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services

    Rendering of services – external parties

    522

    417

    Total sale of goods and rendering of services

    522

    417

    3.2B: Rental Income

    Rental Income

    1,130

    723

    Total rental income

    1,130

    723

    3.2C: Other Revenue

    Other (including cash donations)

    42

    22

    Total other revenue

    42

    22

    Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The majority of rendering of services revenue is generated from fees charged for entry into the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House and is recognised when access occurs.

    Revenue is recognised when:

    1. the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and
    2. the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.

    The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

    OPH receives revenue from the rental of building spaces. This rental revenue is recognised when due under the terms of the rental agreements.

    Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

    Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

    Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

    3.2D: Other Gains

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.2D: Donations of collection items

    Resources received free of charge

    Donations of collection items

    84

    69

    Total other gains

    84

    69

    Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

    3.2E: Revenue from Government

    2018

    2017

    $’000

    $’000

    3.2E: Revenue from Government

    Appropriations

    Departmental appropriations

    16,059

    14,427

    Total revenue from Government

    16,059

    14,427

    Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the Department of Communications and the Arts (a NCCE) as a payment item to OPH) is recognised as Revenue from Government by OPH unless the funding is in the nature of an equity injection or a loan.

    Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when OPH gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned.

    Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

    Note 3.3 – Financial Assets

    3.3A: Cash and cash equivalents

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.3A Cash and Cash equivalents

    Cash on hand

    9,018

    4,505

    Total cash and cash equivalents

    9,018

    4,505

    Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include:

    1. cash on hand;
    2. cash held in term deposits; and
    3. cash held on deposit for payroll and catering events.

    3.3B: Trade and Other Receivables

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    Goods and services

    253

    107

    GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office

    122

    141

    Other

    33

    39

    Total trade and other receivables (net)

    408

    287

    All trade and other receivables are expected to be settled within 12 months. No indicators of impairment were found for trade and other receivables.

    Classification of Financial Assets

    OPH classifies its financial assets as loans and receivables. The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition.

    Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

    Receivables

    Trade receivables and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as ‘receivables’. Receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

    Impairment of Financial Assets

    Financial assets are assessed for impairment at each reporting date. If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

    Note 3.4 – Non-Financial Assets

    3.4A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles

     

    Heritage and cultural building1

    Heritage and cultural collection2

    Plant and equipment

    Intangibles2

    Total

     

    $’000

    $’000

    $’000

    $’000

    $’000

    As at 1 July 2017

    Gross book value

    83,739

    7,973

    1,748

    578

    94,038

    Opening Accumulated depreciation and amortisation

    (4,403)

    -

    (410)

    (229)

    (5,042)

    Total as at 1 July 2017

    79,336

    7,973

    1,338

    349

    88,996

    Additions (iii)

    2,498

    108

    641

    83

    3,330

    Reclassifications

    -

    -

    -

    -

    -

    Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income (i)

    -

    -

    -

    -

    -

    Depreciation and amortisation (v)

    (4,492)

    -

    (382)

    (114)

    (4,988)

    Reversal of write-downs and impairment (vi)

    -

    8

    -

    -

    8

    Disposals3:

    Gross book value of disposed assets

    -

    -

    (126)

    (120)

    (246)

    Accumulated depreciation on disposals

    -

    -

    120

    120

    240

    Total as at 30 June 2018

    77,342

    8,089

    1,591

    318

    87,340

    Total as at 30 June 2018 represented by

    Gross book value

    86,237

    8,089

    2,263

    541

    97,130

    Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment

    (8,895)

    -

    (672)

    ( 223)

    (9,790)

    Total as at 30 June 2018

    77,342

    8,089

    1,591

    318

    87,340

    1. On 01 December 2017, OPH reclassified the building to a ‘Heritage & Cultural asset’. This is on the basis that the building reflects significant cultural heritage of the Australian nation and has satisfactorily met the criteria under the Financial Reporting Rules for Heritage and Cultural classification.

    2. Plant and equipment (P&E) that met the definition of a heritage and cultural (H&C) item were disclosed in the H&C asset class.

    3. Intangibles includes software and leasehold incentive asset. The computer software has a carrying amount of $0.817m and the leasehold incentive has a carrying amount of $0.153m

    4. The net loss from disposal of assets is $0.006m as disclosed on the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

    i. Revaluations of non-financial assets

    Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment and heritage and cultural assets are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

    Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation at the revaluation date was eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset was restated to the revalued amount.

    OPH obtained independent valuations as at 30 June 2016 for the Building, the Property Plant and Equipment assets and the Heritage and Cultural Assets. There have been no significant movements in market values since this date.

    Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

    Asset Class

    Fair value measurement

    Property, plant and equipment

    Depreciated replacement cost

    Heritage and cultural assets – Building

    Depreciated replacement cost

    Heritage and cultural assets – Collections

    Market comparison and sales of similar assets

    ii. Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant, equipment and intangible assets

    Contractual commitments relating to non-financial assets amount to $959,633 (2017: $42,826)

    iii. Acquisition of Assets

    Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition or transfer except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

    Assets acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

    iv. Asset Recognition Threshold

    Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

    v. Depreciation

    Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to OPH using, the straight-line method of depreciation.

    Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

    Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

    Asset class

    2018

    2017

    Heritage and Cultural Assets – Building

    4 to 58 years

    4 to 58 years

    Heritage and Cultural Assets – Collection

    Indefinite

    Indefinite

    Property, Plant and Equipment

    3 to 10 years

    3 to 10 years

    Intangibles

    3 to 5 years

    3 to 5 years

    Heritage and cultural collection assets have indefinite useful lives and are not depreciated.

    The useful lives of Property, Plant and Equipment were amended in line with advice from the independent valuer at 30 June 2016 no other indicators of impairment were noted at 30 June 2018 to change this assessment.

    vi. Impairment

    All assets were assessed for impairment as at the reporting date. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

    The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows and the asset would be replaced if OPH were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

    vii. Derecognition

    An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

    viii. Heritage and Cultural Assets

    OPH has a variety of items in the Collection which relate to the buildings use as the seat of parliament and/or democracy which are used primarily for purposes that relate to their cultural significance. These include the Replica Mace, Replica Crown Jewels, dispatch boxes, portraits, prints, books and political cartoons.

    The Research Library includes books on democracy and political history and it is used as a research resource.

    OPH has adopted appropriate curatorial and preservation policies for these items and they are deemed to have an indefinite useful life and hence are not depreciated. The curatorial and preservation policies are publicly available at: http://static.moadoph.gov.au/ophgovau/media/docs/heritage/HMP/HMP-2015-2020-HTML-V1.html

    ix. Intangibles

    OPH’s intangibles assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

    Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of OPH’s software are 3 to 5 years (2017: 3 to 5 years).

    All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at the reporting date.

    3.4B: Inventories

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.4B: Inventories:

    Retail Shop Inventory

    31

    -

    Total inventories held for sale

    31

    -

    During 2018, $0.0169m of inventory held for sale was recognised as an expense (2017: nil).

    All Inventories are expected to be sold or distributed in the next 12 months.

    Note 3.5 – Payables

    3.5A: Suppliers

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.5A Suppliers:

    Trade creditors and accruals

    574

    290

    Total suppliers

    574

    290

    Supplier payables are settled within 30 days.

    Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

    3.5B: Other Payables

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.5B: Other Payables

    Salaries and wages

    80

    69

    Superannuation

    11

    5

    Unearned income

    25

    25

    Lease Incentive

    228

    243

    Other

    30

    10

    Total other payables

    374

    352

    Total other payables are expected to be settled in no more than 12 months.

    Classification of Financial Liabilities

    Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. OPH only holds other financial liabilities.

    Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon the trade date.

    Other Financial Liabilities

    Other financial liabilities are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

    The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

    Superannuation

    Staff of OPH are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) or a superannuation fund of their choice.

    The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

    The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

    OPH makes employer contributions to the employee’s superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. OPH accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans. Contributions to other funds are at the same rate as the applicable PSSap rate.

    The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

    Note 3.6 – Employee Provisions

    3.6A: Employee Provisions

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.6A Employee Provisions

    Leave (annual and long service leave)

    1,973

    1,903

    Total employee provisions

    1,973

    1,903

    Measurement of Employee Provisions

    Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

    Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligations at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

    Leave

    The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.

    The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including OPH’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

    The liability for long service leave has been determined using present value techniques in accordance with the short hand method as per PGPA Act s24 as at the reporting date. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation using the shorthand method.

    Separation and Redundancy

    No provision is required for separation and redundancy of employees.

    Note 3.7 – Financial Instruments

    3.7A: Categories of Financial Instruments

    2018

    2017

     

    $’000

    $’000

    3.7A: Categories of Financial Instruments

    Financial Assets

    Loans and receivables

    Cash and Cash equivalents

    6,518

    4,505

    Cash on deposit

    2,500

    -

    Trade and other receivables

    286

    146

    Total financial assets

    9,304

    4,651

    Financial Liabilities

    Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

    Suppliers

    574

    290

    Other Payables

    56

    34

    Total financial liabilities

    630

    324

    The net fair value of the financial assets and liabilities are their carrying amounts. OPH derived $214,000 interest income from financial assets in the current year (2017: $94,000).

    3.7B: Credit Risk

    OPH is exposed to minimal credit risk with the maximum exposure arising from potential default of a debtor. The amount is equal to the total amount of receivables for services of $253,000 (2017: $107,000) as disclosed at Note 3.3B.

    3.7C: Liquidity Risk

    OPH has sufficient available financial assets to meet all financial liabilities at the reporting date.

    Note 3.8 – Fair Value Measurement

    The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The remaining assets and liabilities disclosed in the statement of financial position do not apply the fair value hierarchy.

    Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

    2018

    2017

    $’000

    $’000

    Non-financial assets

    Heritage and cultural – building

    77,342

    79,336

    Heritage and cultural – collections

    8,089

    7,973

    Property, plant and equipment

    1,591

    1,338

    Total non-financial assets

    87,041

    88,647

    OPH deems no transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at the end of the reporting period.

    The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of OPH’s heritage and cultural collection assets are identical or similar items through recorded auction sales, catalogues and known private collections. Significant increases (decreases) in any of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.

    The highest and best use of all non-financial assets is the same as their current use.

    Note 3.9 – Key Management Personnel Remuneration

    Key management personnel (KMP) are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of OPH. The key management personnel are determined to be the Director, Deputy Director and Board Members. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

    2018

    2017

     

    $

    $

    Short-term employee benefits

    592,987

    530,425

    Post-employment benefits

    54,560

    59,978

    Other long-term employee benefits

    75,132

    59,910

    Total key management personnel remuneration expenses

    722,679

    650,313

    The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table are 7 (2017: 8).

    The Remuneration Tribunal sets remuneration for the Board. During 2017–18, the Tribunal made a determination on the ongoing sitting fees, there has been one sitting of the board under the new remuneration arrangements.

    Note 3.10 – Related Party Disclosures

    Related party relationships:

    The entity is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to this entity are Directors and Executive, and other Australian Government entities.

    Transactions with related parties:

    Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens.

    There have been no transactions with related parties during the financial year that are material or are outside the normal terms of trade.

    Note 3.11 – Variances to Budget Commentary

    Old Parliament House operates in a dynamic environment with the development of new exhibitions and managing the heritage values of the building and its content. As a result, activities and events that occur during the financial year may not have been anticipated when preparing the budget.

    Broadly, the majority of variances are for revenue items (and the flow on effect to expenditure) and for the assets recognised on the balance sheet.

    Variances in actual revenue to budget and the impact on the financial statements

    Historically, OPH generally makes conservative estimates for generation of own source revenue. In addition OPH does not budget for ‘Other revenue’ and ‘Other Gains’ due to the difficulty in predicting this income as it relies on donations and the approval of grant applications. At the time of preparing the budget the success or otherwise of grant applications is unknown. However, OPH makes concerted effort each year to improve the generation of its own source revenue, and this year has again made modest gains in this area.

    As a result of the above actual revenue was greater than budget on the comprehensive income statement, which in turn impacted trade and other receivables on the statement of financial position. Cash receipts on the cash flow statements were therefore also greater than budget. In addition, this increased cash available to be used for increased supplier expenditure.

    Variances in actual expenditure to budget and the impact on the financial statements

    Employee benefits were greater than anticipated in the budget mainly due to a change in Board remuneration methodology (set by the Remuneration Tribunal Determination).

    Supplier expenses were slightly higher than anticipated in the budget due to increased expenditure on key strategic priorities as a result of increased generation of own source revenue.

    The budget for depreciation and amortisation was prepared based on an estimated schedule and completion of capital works on the building and for the exhibitions. The difference is due to the timing differences between what was estimated to be completed and the actual completion (and therefore capitalisation) of the new assets.

    There was a small variance to budget for the write down and impairment of assets as OPH does not typically budget for these items.

    These events affected the variances to budget for the statement of comprehensive income, statement of financial position (increased payables) and cash flow statement (cash used for payments to employees and suppliers). In addition, the timing of final payment runs before the end of the financial year influenced the level of payables.

    Variances in asset related expenditure and valuations and the impact on the financial statements

    OPH received $13.9m over 3 years from the Modernisation Fund in the 2018 Federal Budget. Asset related expenditure in a heritage environment requires considerable amounts of planning and approval before commencement. The majority of variances in asset related expenditure relate to changes in the scheduling of capital works.

    Heritage and Cultural Building

    During the financial year OPH reclassified the building to a ‘Heritage & Cultural asset’ as it met the criteria under the Financial Reporting Rules for Heritage and Cultural classification. As a result the financial statements now show a Heritage and Cultural Building category.

    The variance to budget is due to completion of less capital works on the building than anticipated when preparing the budget.

    Heritage and Cultural Collections

    The timing of collection purchase is uncertain due to the limited availability of appropriate items in the market. Furthermore, OPH does not budget for the receipt of donated heritage and cultural items due to their uncertain nature. This year OPH was donated items to the value of $84,000.

    Plant and Equipment

    Variances in Plant and Equipment related to the delay in the timing of the design, construction and fit-out of new exhibitions compared to the timing anticipated when preparing the budget.

    Intangibles

    Changes in the design and timing of new exhibitions developed this year resulted in less intangibles purchased during the year than anticipated when preparing the budget.

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    Indexes

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    Compliance list

    Requirement

    Source

    Part of the report

    Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

    Approval of the report by directors

    Section 17BB

    Letter of transmittal

    Parliamentary standards of presentation

    Section 17BC

    Throughout

    Plain English and clear design

    Section 17BD

    Throughout

    Enabling legislation

    Paragraph 17BE(a)

    38

    Legislated objects and functions

    Paragraph 17BE(b)(i)

    38

    Purpose

    Paragraph 17BE(b)(ii)

    38

    Responsible minister

    Paragraph 17BE(c)

    38

    Ministerial directions

    Paragraph 17BE(d) and (f)

    38

    Policy orders

    Paragraphs 17BE(e) and (f)

    38

    Annual performance statements

    Paragraph 17BE(g)

    14–16

    Significant issues related to financial compliance

    Paragraph 17BE(h) and (i)

    38

    Details and attendance of board members

    Paragraph 17BE(j)

    40

    Organisational structure

    Paragraph 17BE(k)

    39

    Location

    Paragraph 17BE(l)

    38

    Governance

    Paragraph 17BE(m)

    39–43

    Related entity transactions

    Paragraphs 17BE(n) and (o)

    40

    Significant activities and changes

    Paragraph 17BE(p)

    8–11

    Judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals

    Paragraph 17BE(q)

    43

    Reports by the Auditor-General, a parliamentary committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

    Paragraph 17BE(r)

    43

    Information from subsidiaries

    Paragraph 17BE(s)

    39

    Indemnity and insurance

    Paragraph 17BE(t)

    43

    Compliance index

    Paragraph 17BE(u)

    76

    Other reporting requirements

    Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

    Section 311A

    44

    Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

    Section 516A

    44

    Work Health and Safety Act 2011

    Schedule 2, Part 4

    44

    Index

    A

    ABC, 10, 30, 31

    studio upgrade, 21

    Aboriginal Tent Embassy, 35, 43

    accountable authority, Board as, 14

    achievements against priorities, 17–25

    acquisitions, collection, 15, 41; see also donations, collection

    Acquisitions Committee, 41

    administrative tribunals, 43

    advertising and market research, 44

    After Dark experiences, 17, 35

    Ainslie School, collaboration with, 20

    air-conditioning systems, upgrade of, 21

    analysis of performance, 15–16

    annual performance statements, 14–16; see also performance report

    attendance, Board meetings, 40

    audiovisual services, 18, 21

    audit, internal; see Audit Finance and Risk Committee (Board)

    Audit Finance and Risk Committee (Board), 40, 43

    Auditor-General; see Australian National Audit Office

    Australian Cartoonists’ Association, partnership with, 27

    Australian Electoral Commission, 11

    Australian Information Commissioner, 43

    Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, 11, 35

    Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey, case study, 33

    Australian National Audit Office, 40, 43

    audit report, 49–50

    Australian Public Service Code of Conduct, 42

    Australian Public Service Employment Principles, 42

    Australian Public Service Values, 42

    awards, 6, 7, 10, 17, 22, 26, 27

    B

    bathrooms, heritage, conservation of, 22

    Behind the Lines 2017: The Three-ring Circus (exhibition), 11, 17, 18, 19

    case study, 27

    Behind the Lines website, 16, 18

    Belonging, Being and Becoming—The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia (publication), 26

    blog strategy, 16; see also social media presence

    Board, OPH

    as accountable authority, 14

    committees, 40

    establishment, 39

    members, 40

    role, 39

    booking procedures, events, 17, 25

    brass fixtures and hardware, conservation project, 22

    building maintenance and conservation, 21–24

    funding for, 8, 9, 48

    see also conservation projects

    C

    Canberra and Region Heritage Festival, 17, 35

    Canberra Hospital School, partnership with, 32

    Canberra Theatre, pop-up exhibition, 17

    Canberra Writers Festival, 10

    Capital Steering Committee, 41

    capital works program, 21

    funding for, 8, 9, 48

    see also building maintenance and conservation

    Card Castle (participatory exhibition), 10, 17

    case study, 28

    Cartoonist of the Year 2017, 27

    cartoons, political; see Behind the Lines 2017: The Three-ring Circus (exhibition); Political Cartooning (online resource)

    case studies

    Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey, 33

    Behind the Lines (exhibition), 27

    Card Castle (participatory exhibition), 28

    collection storage project, 29

    Democracy, Media and Me (digital excursion), 32

    Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference (event), 30–31

    guided tours, 35

    PlayUP—The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard (exhibition), 26

    The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals (exhibition), 34

    catering and hospitality services, 17

    Chair

    financial report statement, 51

    statement, 8

    Charter of Democracy, 10

    Chief Financial Officer, financial report statement, 51

    Children in Museums Awards, shortlist, 10

    civics education activities; see online learning resources; outreach activities; school programs

    Client Service Charter, 42

    Code of Conduct, APS, 42

    collaborative activities; see partnerships

    collecting categories, 23–24

    Collection Development Plan, 23

    collection management and access (key performance indicator), 15; see also collection management and development

    collection management and development, 16, 22–24, 29; see also heritage management

    collection storage project, 22

    case study, 29

    Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey, 43

    committees

    Board, 40

    management, 24, 41–42

    Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework, 42, 43

    Commonwealth Ombudsman, 43

    Communications and the Arts portfolio, 38

    Communications and the Arts Portfolio Budget Statements 2017–18, 14

    compliance index, 76

    conferences, participation in, 10

    conservation projects, 22; see also building maintenance and conservation

    consultation, stakeholder, 23

    contact information, agency, ii

    contractors, work health and safety, 44

    corporate Commonwealth entity, OPH as, 8, 11, 25, 38

    corporate governance, 41–42; see also governance arrangements

    Corporate Plan 2017–18, 14, 17, 42

    Council of Australasian Museum Directors Executive Mentoring Program, 24

    Crinkling News (newspaper), 11

    cross-agency staff development programs, 24

    cultural awareness training, staff, 24, 43

    Curator on the Couch series, 19, 32

    curriculum, national, alignment with, 10, 14, 16, 19

    D

    deliverables, 14; see also key performance indicators

    Democracy. Are You In? (exhibition), 10, 17, 21

    Democracy, Media and Me (digital excursion), 10, 11, 19

    case study, 32

    Democracy 100: You Can Make a Difference (event), 10, 16, 17

    case study, 30–31

    Deputy Director, role, 41

    development of democracy collecting category, additions to, 23

    digital excursions, introduction of, 10, 19, 32

    digital infrastructure program, commencement of, 19

    Digital technologies, the spirit of place and active citizenship at the Museum of Australian Democracy (conference paper), 10

    Director

    financial report statement, 51

    report, 9–11

    role, 40

    donations, collection, 23

    donors, 11, 23; see also donations, collection

    E

    ecologically sustainable development report, 44–45

    education activities; see online learning resources; outreach activities; school programs

    Employment Principles, APS, 42

    energy efficiency, organisational, 45

    Enlighten festival, 10, 17, 18, 28

    Enriched experiences (Strategic priority 1), 17–19

    Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

    conservation requirements under, 44

    performance report, 44–45

    equity injections, 48; see also financial statements

    ethical standards, 42

    European Museum Academy, 10

    events program; see exhibitions and events; outreach activities

    executive committees, 41

    Executive, role, 40–41

    Executive Management Group, 41

    exhibitions and events, 10, 17–19

    travelling, 11, 15, 27

    see also online learning resources

    expenditure and income, agency, 48; see also financial statements

    external scrutiny, 43

    F

    feedback, visitor, 10, 16, 26, 42

    financial performance, summary, 48; see also financial statements

    financial statements, 48–72

    independent audit report, 49–50

    see also financial performance, summary

    financial sustainability, long-term, 25

    Finders Keepers (exhibition), 18

    fraud control, 43

    Fraud Control Framework and Policy, 42

    Freedom of the Press (exhibition), 21

    funding, agency, 25, 48; see also financial statements

    furniture, heritage

    funding for preservation, 48

    storage, 23, 29

    Fyshwick collection storage facilities, 22, 29

    G

    galleries, permanent, 10

    funding for, 9

    Getting it Together (online resource), 19

    Ghost Hunters tour, 17, 35

    gifts; see donations, collection

    Google, 11

    Google Analytics, 19

    governance arrangements, 38–45; see also corporate governance

    government policy orders, 38

    Great Easter Egg Trail, The, 17, 25

    Guidelines on information and advertising campaigns by non-corporate Commonwealth entities, 44

    H

    hands-on exhibitions, 17; see also Card Castle (participatory exhibition)

    Hawke, Bob (former prime minister), 10, 30

    heating system, upgrade, 21

    Heritage Actions Committee, 41, 44

    Heritage Collection, 23, 29

    heritage collection storage project, 22, 29

    heritage management, 21–24; see also collection management and development; Heritage Management Plan

    Heritage Management Plan, 44

    House of Representatives spaces, 29

    preservation works, 22

    Howard, John (former prime minister), 10, 30

    human resources management, 24, 44

    I

    ICT activities, upgrade and maintenance, 21

    immigration stories; see The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals (exhibition)

    income and expenditure, agency, 48; see also financial statements; own-source income, generation of; self-generated income

    indemnity and insurance, 43

    Indigenous cultural awareness training, staff, 24, 43

    Indigenous Experiences of Democracy (tour), 35, 43

    induction courses

    Board, 39

    work health and safety training, 44

    Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, University of Canberra, 10, 11, 31

    insurance and indemnity, 43

    internal audit; see Audit Finance and Risk Committee (Board)

    International Association of Children in Museums, 10

    Interpretation and Learning Collection, 23

    J

    judicial decisions, 43

    K

    key performance indicators, 15; see also deliverables

    L

    leadership program, staff, 24

    learning and development, staff, 24

    learning programs; see school programs

    learning resources, online, 10, 19; see also digital excursions, introduction of; online presence

    letter of transmittal, iii

    Lighthouse Innovation, partnership with, 20

    lighting, upgrades, 21

    loans, collection, 23

    M

    maintenance and conservation, building, 21–24

    Malcolm Fraser: Refugee Crisis 1977 (secondary school program), 19

    management committees, 24, 41–42

    market research and advertising, 44

    master plan, building, 11

    media coverage, 17, 35

    MediaMe conference, 11

    mentoring program, staff, 24

    migration and citizenship exhibition, 10, 17, 34

    Minister for Communications and the Arts, 8, 11, 38

    ministerial directions, 38

    Museums and Galleries National Awards, 6, 10, 17, 26

    Museum of Australian Democracy, role, 2, 8, 38

    N

    NAIDOC Week exhibition, 43

    National Archives of Australia, 11

    National Collecting Institutions Touring and Outreach Program, 27

    national curriculum, alignment with, 10, 14, 16, 19

    National Portrait Gallery, 11

    National Reconciliation Week, 35, 43

    National Trust ACT Heritage Award, 7, 10, 22

    1977 refugee policy, Fraser government, 19

    Nineteenth ICOMOS Triennial General Assembly and International Scientific Symposium, 10

    noncompliance issues, 38

    notifiable incidents, 44

    O

    occupational health and safety; see work health and safety

    offsite activities; see outreach activities; travelling exhibitions

    Old Parliament House, conservation and management, 21–24

    Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan 2015–2020, 44

    Old Parliament House collecting category, additions to, 24

    Ombudsman, Commonwealth, 43

    online learning resources, 10, 19; see also digital excursions, introduction of; online presence

    online presence, 10, 16, 18–19; see also online learning resources; social media presence

    online visitation numbers, 7, 9, 10

    onsite visits, 6, 15–16, 19

    Operational Environmental Management Plan, 44

    organisational role, 38

    organisational structure, 39

    Our organisational culture (Strategic priority 4), 24–25

    outcome and deliverables, 14; see also key performance indicators

    outreach activities, 10, 15, 16; see also exhibitions and events; online learning resources; school programs; travelling exhibitions

    own-source income, generation of, 7, 25, 48; see also financial statements; self-generated income

    P

    paper use, organisational, 45

    participation in public and school programs (key performance indicator), 15; see also outreach activities; school programs

    participatory events, 10, 17–19, 28

    partnerships, 10–11, 17, 19, 20, 27, 32, 35

    people management, 24–25, 44

    performance indicators, 15; see also deliverables

    performance report, 13–35

    performance results, 14–15; see also performance report; snapshot of results

    performance statement, annual, 14–16; see also performance report

    place, The (Strategic priority 3), 21–24

    Playing the Long Game project (award for), 7, 10, 22

    PlayUP space, refurbishment, 10, 21

    PlayUP—The Right to Have an Opinion and Be Heard (exhibition), 6, 10, 16, 17, 18, 21

    case study, 26

    policies and procedures, corporate, 42

    Political and Parliamentary Collection, 23

    Political Cartooning (online resource), 19; see also Behind the Lines 2017: The Three-ring Circus (exhibition)

    political influences and movements collecting category, additions to, 24

    pop-up exhibition, 17

    Portfolio Budget Statements 2017–18, 14

    preservation projects, 22; see also building maintenance and conservation

    prime ministers collecting category, additions to, 23

    product development, online, 19

    professional development activities, teachers, 19, 32

    program survey rating (by teachers) (key performance indicator), 15; see also teachers

    promotion and media coverage; see advertising and marketing

    Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, 11, 14, 38

    Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Establishing Old Parliament House) Rule 2016, 38, 39

    Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, 40

    Public Interest Disclosure Policy, 42

    public programs and activities; see exhibitions and events; outreach activities

    Public Service Modernisation Fund, 8, 48

    purpose, organisational, 14, 38

    R

    reception area, new, 25

    Reconciliation Action Plan, 43

    recycling measures, organisational, 45

    Reflective Leadership Forum, 24

    refugee policy, Fraser government, 19

    related entity transactions, 40

    responsible minister, 38

    Restaurant Associates, partnership with, 17

    results, performance, 14–15; see also snapshot of results

    revenue, 8, 11, 25, 48; see also financial statements

    risk management, 43

    Risk Management Policy and Framework, 42, 43

    role

    agency, 2, 8, 14, 38

    Board, 39

    Director, 40

    Executive, 40

    management committees, 41–42

    Roller Digital ticketing system, 25

    S

    safety standards, compliance with; see work health and safety

    satisfaction, client; see feedback, visitor

    school holiday programs, 20, 26

    school programs, 6, 10, 15–16, 19–20

    Schools learning (Strategic priority 2), 19–20

    Searching for Significance (primary school program), 19

    self-generated income, 8, 11, 25, 48; see also financial statements; own-source income, generation of

    Senate spaces, upgrades, 21, 22

    Senior Management Group, 41

    service charter, client, 42

    snapshot of results, 6–7

    social media presence, 7, 10, 18

    staff development, 24

    Staff Guidelines on the APS Code of Conduct, 42

    staff satisfaction survey, 25

    stakeholder consultation, 23

    Stanley Awards (cartoons), 27

    State of the service report, 25

    storage facilities, collections, 22, 29

    Stories from the Bunker series, 19

    Strategic Framework 2018–23, 42

    strategic planning, 9, 11, 42

    strategic priorities, 17–25

    Strategic priority 1: Enriched experiences, 17–19

    Strategic priority 2: Schools learning, 19–20

    Strategic priority 3: The place, 21–24

    Strategic priority 4: Our organisational culture, 24–25

    structure, organisational, 39

    sustainability, environmental; see ecologically sustainable development report

    sustainability, financial, 25

    T

    teachers

    feedback, 15, 16, 19

    professional development activities for, 19, 32

    Teen Start-up: People Power (holiday workshop), 20

    10 Fast Facts of Australian Democracy, 18

    The Gift: Art, Artefacts and Arrivals (exhibition), 10, 17

    case study, 34

    The place (Strategic priority 3), 21–24

    ticketing system, introduction of, 17, 25

    Tim the Yowie Man, Top Secret tour with, 17, 35

    timed entry ticketing, introduction of, 17, 25

    Top Secret Tour with Tim the Yowie Man, 17, 35

    touring exhibitions; see travelling exhibitions

    tours, 17, 35, 43

    ‘transcribe-a-thon’ event, 19

    transmittal letter, iii

    travelling exhibitions, 11, 15, 27

    trends, annual visitor numbers, 15, 16

    trust, in public institutions, 9, 10, 31

    2017–18 Budget, 8; see also Portfolio Budget Statements 2017–18

    2018 Children in Museums Awards, shortlist, 10

    U

    United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (exhibition theme), 10, 17, 26

    University of Canberra, 10, 11, 19, 31

    University of Technology Sydney, 11

    University of Western Sydney, 11

    upgrade works; see building maintenance and conservation; capital works program

    V

    Values, APS, 42

    ventilation systems, upgrade of, 21

    vision, Museum of Australian Democracy 1–3, 9

    visitor interactions (key performance indicator), 15; see also visitor numbers

    visitor numbers, 6–7, 15, 16, 17

    students and teachers, 6, 15, 16, 19

    trends in numbers, 15, 16

    visitor programs; see exhibitions and events; outreach activities; school programs

    visitor satisfaction (key performance indicator), 15; see also feedback, visitor

    volunteers, 11

    training courses for, 24, 43, 44

    W

    waste management, organisational, 45

    water conservation measures, organisational, 45

    website

    Behind the Lines, 16, 18

    homepage redevelopment, 16

    visits, 7, 10, 16, 18

    see also online presence; social media presence

    wellbeing, staff, 44

    What Matters? (competition), 20

    White Australia policy, event relating to, 19

    Whitlam Institute, partnership with, 20

    work health and safety, 44

    Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 44

    Work Health and Safety Committee, 42

    Workplace Consultative Committee, 24, 42

    Workplace Harassment Guidelines, 42

    Y

    year in review, 5–11; see also performance report; snapshot of results

    18 King George Terrace

    Parkes ACT 2600 Australia

    PO Box 3934

    Manuka ACT 2603

    P (02) 6270 8222

    F (02) 6270 8235

    E info@moadoph.gov.au

    W moadoph.gov.au

    ABN 30 620 774 963

Our vision

Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

Year in Review

Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

Report on performance

Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

Governance

Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

Financial statements

Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

Indexes

Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

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Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

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Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

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Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

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Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

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Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

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Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

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Old Parliament House | Annual Report 2017–18

Delivering Democracy, Media and Me—our first digital excursion program for students who are not able to visit the museum A refresh of the PlayUp space was undertaken as part of capital works Brass fittings, such as door handles, were cleaned, recoated with lacquer and given a protective coating of wax